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Climbers which won't block out the sun

mathewdavidbrownmathewdavidbrown CambridgeshirePosts: 35
Hi all, I'm looking for a summer flowering climber to grow up either side of an arch which stands at the foot of a border. I'm after something which isn't a light-blocking mass of leaves, as clematis tends to be. Any recommendations?

Thanks

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 41,327
    A bit difficult. All climbers have quite a lot of leaves. They wouldn't thrive without them  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • CharlotteFCharlotteF East Surrey, UKPosts: 337
    With the exception of some of the larger - leaved spring flowering types I don't find clematis too heavy. Most of mine are group 3s and the foliage is fairly delicate. I can't think of any climbers that keep all their leaves at the bottom, that would be convenient 😉
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 41,327
    Many of my clematis have plenty of foliage at the bottom, especially the early alpinas etc, but if they're left to their own devices, and especially if not properly pruned,  they can be leggy, with all the foliage at the top. 
    Have you got a photo of the site @mathewdavidbrown? I'm struggling to get an idea of how it looks  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • mathewdavidbrownmathewdavidbrown CambridgeshirePosts: 35
    Fairygirl said:
    Many of my clematis have plenty of foliage at the bottom, especially the early alpinas etc, but if they're left to their own devices, and especially if not properly pruned,  they can be leggy, with all the foliage at the top. 
    Have you got a photo of the site @mathewdavidbrown? I'm struggling to get an idea of how it looks  :)
    I should have thought of that really. I'll take a shot in the morning :blush:
  • PlantmindedPlantminded WirralPosts: 131
    Hi @mathewdavidbrown, it depends on your soil type and aspect.  Some jasmines, like Star jasmine, Trachelospermum jasminoides, are quite fine leafed, or there's the possiblility of a climbing rose, which can be pruned to be as bulky or sparse as you like.  I'm sure someone will have a suitable recommendation but here's a taster:

    English Rose Climbers | David Austin roses
    "Gardening adds years to your life and life to your years."  Anon.
  • mathewdavidbrownmathewdavidbrown CambridgeshirePosts: 35
    Hi @mathewdavidbrown, it depends on your soil type and aspect.  Some jasmines, like Star jasmine, Trachelospermum jasminoides, are quite fine leafed, or there's the possiblility of a climbing rose, which can be pruned to be as bulky or sparse as you like.  I'm sure someone will have a suitable recommendation but here's a taster:

    English Rose Climbers | David Austin roses
    Trachelospermum jasminoides I'm growing at the back, so maybe worth seeing how that turns out. Good call. Believe it or not, it didn't cross my mind! 
  • mathewdavidbrownmathewdavidbrown CambridgeshirePosts: 35
    Fairygirl said:
    Many of my clematis have plenty of foliage at the bottom, especially the early alpinas etc, but if they're left to their own devices, and especially if not properly pruned,  they can be leggy, with all the foliage at the top. 
    Have you got a photo of the site @mathewdavidbrown? I'm struggling to get an idea of how it looks  :)
    As promised. My yard looks a bit like Aleppo at the moment, but you get the idea. 
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 10,128
    A lot of Clematis would work very well there.
    Southern trees bear a strange fruit
    Blood on the leaves and blood at the root
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 41,327

    I'd agree. Loads of clematis that would suit that site, whether planted into the border on the left, or in a new space on the right. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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