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Moving a pheasant berry?

robairdmacraignilrobairdmacraignil CorkPosts: 641
edited October 2021 in Problem solving
Good morning!

Got a number of pheasant berry (Leycesteria formosa) growing in the garden here and I like them. Trying to make the garden here as supportive as possible for wildlife so it seems like the ideal plant to have more of. There is one after self seeding next to a couple of plants I want to allow get bigger. The plants that are being overgrown by the pheasant berry are more delicate and so I hope to keep growing where they are, but just wondered is there anyone with advice on how to most successfully move the pheasant berry? I have previously planted another self seeded pheasant berry I was given by a neighbour and it suddenly died.

I found an older discussion on this and the only advice I could see was moving it once rain had become more frequent in autumn should be fine. I'm going to wait until a tree sapling that is not in a good position for getting bigger is moved to give me a position to move the pheasant berry to, but just not sure if it is better to cut down the top growth of the pheasant berry before moving it. I think it is still small enough that I can move the whole lot but I have read some general advice that reducing top growth allows transplanted shrubs more time for the roots to settle and can work better. Does anybody have any experience or advice on moving pheasant berry?
Thanks for any comments.

Happy gardening!

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,289
    I think you could safely just cut it back and dig it out, and re position it @robairdmacraignil. Cutting back top growth does make it easier for woody plants and shrubs to establish, but this time of year onwards is always easier because of weather conditions. 
    It sounds like it has a decent enough root system. I don't grow them now, but there are loads in gardens round about me. 

    I wonder if your previous one was just too immature to get going?
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 22,978
    I find it easier to move a young plant (1 year old). There's probably one or two about. I've never had success moving a big one.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • AnniDAnniD South West UKPosts: 10,630
    I have moved one years ago and it survived, can't be sure what time of year it was but probably Autumn.
    As long as you get plenty of root system and a big planting hole ready and waiting, it should be fine. I use the "move it so quickly it doesn't even realise" system  :)
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,289
    That's usually my method too @AnniD ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I've moved lots of these and don't remember losing any. I have had small seedlings that sprung up from them just die for no apparent reason however.
    If you want to keep the top growth then I would dig it up and see how much of the roots you can get. If you are able to get them all, ie it's a young plant that comes out easily, then you shouldn't need to chop it back down unless you are transplanting it to a far drier or sunnier spot.

    If prunning is needed then try striking the cut stems as they are simple to grow from cuttings. 
  • robairdmacraignilrobairdmacraignil CorkPosts: 641
    edited October 2021
    Fairygirl said:
    I think you could safely just cut it back and dig it out, and re position it @robairdmacraignil. Cutting back top growth does make it easier for woody plants and shrubs to establish, but this time of year onwards is always easier because of weather conditions. 
    It sounds like it has a decent enough root system. I don't grow them now, but there are loads in gardens round about me. 

    I wonder if your previous one was just too immature to get going?
    Thanks for the reply. I am a bit reluctant to chop it down as it is currently still flowering and has some berries so will probably try the method suggested by thevictorianzFH0qqPW and see how it goes when the root ball comes up. It is on fairly stony ground so not that confident I will be able to get the bulk of the roots and if not I can just chop the top growth back then. I really don't know what went wrong with the one that suddenly failed when I planted it a couple of years back as it seemed fairly healthy before it suddenly wilted. Got lots of seedlings about the place now anyway so wont need to multiply it with cuttings anyway.

    Thanks for all the advice and comments.


  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,289
    If it isn't very big- ie no more than a couple of feet,  it really won't be a problem.
    I wasn't sure you'd mentioned the size of it, but unless it's in the 4 feet sort of range ,it should be fine.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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