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Planting next to new retaining wall

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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,903
    Ah - no problem. I wasn't sure if that was your house, or if yours was to the right of the photo [unseen].
    That makes it easier then.  :)
    I thought you were adding an internal wall where the path is. I take it the fence [on the left]  is also yours? If so, you'd need permission for altering the height. It would also need to be a very substantial wall to hold back the weight of soil.
    I think you need to get someone in to check the regs on that, as well as approaching the planning dept of your council   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    Ah - no problem. I wasn't sure if that was your house, or if yours was to the right of the photo [unseen].
    That makes it easier then.  :)
    I thought you were adding an internal wall where the path is. I take it the fence [on the left]  is also yours? If so, you'd need permission for altering the height. It would also need to be a very substantial wall to hold back the weight of soil.
    I think you need to get someone in to check the regs on that, as well as approaching the planning dept of your council   :)
    Yes I know it will be a big job and require various planning applications, but my question was really about planting and whether trees/hedges would be suitable to plant on the edge of this new retaining wall, the last thing I’d want to do is risk damaging it
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,903
    Oh that won't be a problem. Just make sure everything is well compacted and the ground's allowed to settle well before planting   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl said:
    Oh that won't be a problem. Just make sure everything is well compacted and the ground's allowed to settle well before planting   :)

    Thanks! How long does it need to settle? I’d probably avoid planting trees tbh, but I considered a hedge or something
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,903
    Difficult to say, because it'll depend on the structure of the soil etc. If you were able to do it [the construction etc] by the end of the year for example, it would probably settle well by late spring, because of weather. You'd also need to top it up before planting. The longer you can leave it the better though. 
    Just bear in mind that a hedge will need a gap so that you can get in behind it easily to maintain it. Don't want you balancing on a tall ladder from the car parking side  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • seacrowsseacrows Posts: 219
    Fairygirl said:
    Ah - no problem. I wasn't sure if that was your house, or if yours was to the right of the photo [unseen].
    That makes it easier then.  :)
    I thought you were adding an internal wall where the path is. I take it the fence [on the left]  is also yours? If so, you'd need permission for altering the height. It would also need to be a very substantial wall to hold back the weight of soil.
    I think you need to get someone in to check the regs on that, as well as approaching the planning dept of your council   :)
    Yes I know it will be a big job and require various planning applications, but my question was really about planting and whether trees/hedges would be suitable to plant on the edge of this new retaining wall, the last thing I’d want to do is risk damaging it
     Thinking ahead a few years, I wouldn't recommend full size trees, their roots are capable of damage, but hedging, no problem. Just not leylandii. I wouldn't plant anything very greedy for water, as you should get really good drainage, what with the wall and rubble base.
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