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Tomato blight?

I'm having a really bad year for tomatoes in the greenhouse.  Frosty April and cold May did not help!  I'm using an organic wool based compost (Dalefoot) which says I don't need to feed, so I haven't.  Initially I was really pleased with growth and vigour of the plants (despite the very poor start) but now I think I may have blight?  My greenhouse is well ventilated and I've kept up with watering but wondered if anyone can confirm this.  I've not had this in the past.  

I'm attaching some photos.

Thanks in advance.

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,289
    Not blight, just very unhealthy. Is it just the top foliage that's like that?
    Perfectly normal to have yellowing foliage, but normally it would be the lower stuff, which you can then remove.
    It doesn't matter what you grow them in, you need to feed them when fruits are setting. Have you got any fruit? 
    Watering needs to be consistent - that's more important than the amount.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • No it's not just the top foliage and not every plant.  I have some fruit but not as much as I would have expected.
    I think I will be complaining to Dalefoot Composts as this compost is advertised as tomato compost which doesn't need extra feed.
    You are the second person who has said to feed.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 47,289
    It certainly doesn't sound as if it's very great. 
    All commercial compost has a 'level' of feed in it which keep plants going well enough until fruiting stage, and that will depend on the make, and the plant variety, and how they're being grown too. I doubt any compost would have enough in it to see a tomato through to it's final stages. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,368
    Their blurb does say that their wool compost needs no additional nutrients during the season. The compost contains all that's needed to grow toms - just add water

    https://www.dalefootcomposts.co.uk/products/wool-compost-for-tomatoes.p.aspx

    I tried a wool-based compost a few years ago - it was awful
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 8,047
    Tomatoes are greedy, unless they are in the ground,they need a weekly feed once they set fruit.
  • Sounds like this is one to chalk up to experience!  I'll stick to the (cheaper) peat-free I've used in previous years.

    The outdoor toms I'm growing seem fine but rather thin on fruits at the moment. I live in the NE of England and summer has gone awol for the last few weeks - very little sunshine or heat.
  • No it's not just the top foliage and not every plant.  I have some fruit but not as much as I would have expected.
    I think I will be complaining to Dalefoot Composts as this compost is advertised as tomato compost which doesn't need extra feed.
    You are the second person who has said to feed.
    I have grown my cherry toms in 18" pots in the contents of half a bag of Levenson's Tomorite grow bag (greenhouse). They get 500mls rain water at PH 6.0 every day and when the 2nd truss appears I begin feeding each Saturday with 20ml/5ltr until the last tomato ripens. I stop fruit growth at 6 trusses and increase potassium once all trusses are bearing fruit. If I didn't feed them after 4 weeks I would expect the plant to be dead or pointless after 10 weeks or so.
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