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Opinions please :)

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  • KCMM09KCMM09 WalesPosts: 72
    @JennyJ I’ve put off geraniums because I have cats and on the whole mostly have cat safe plants. They’ve been ok with the garden so far so maybe I could give it a go, thanks 
  • JennyJJennyJ DoncasterPosts: 4,139
    According to the PDSA website it's pelargoniums (the tender plants commonly known as geraniums) not hardy geraniums that are poisonous to cats, and neither of them are on Cats Protection's list (although box is - is that what your cones and balls are? - and so is clematis). Neighbours' cats frequent our garden and never seem to come to any harm (ours is an indoor old boy). Come to think of it I don't think I've ever noticed a geranium leaf that's been eaten by anything, not even slugs and snails.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 25,719
    @JennyJ is right.  You are confusing tender pelargoniums from SA with hardy European  geraniums.  The latter are perfectly safe and cats are clever enough anyway not to eat the wrong plants.   I've had cats and geraniums and all sorts of other "poisonous" plants for decades and no bother.

    The only plant I worry about is lilies as their pollen can brush off on the coat of a passing cat and they they lick it off when cleaning and can die.  I grow my lilies in pots so the pollen is above cat level and if I have cut lilies in the house I remove the stamens.  Stops the pollen staining tablecloths too.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • KCMM09KCMM09 WalesPosts: 72
    Ahh right ok! 
    Yes the clematis I planted and monitored how they were with it and the buxus they find boring so don’t tend to go there either. It’s just every time I get a new one I’m cautious as they’re my fur babies 😂
  • KCMM09KCMM09 WalesPosts: 72
    @Obelixx do you mind me asking, this is another query seperate ...

    You know you said the back wall looks like it could benefit from a climber etc? 
    Well I have a star jasmine on the left in the sleeper which didn’t grow enough last year to start filling the trellis I have on the side ( you can’t see this as I didn’t photograph patio) 
    question is , would it be a good idea if I moved the star jasmine to the corner on the back wall by the shed or not ? David Austin white roses are there. 

  • TopbirdTopbird Posts: 6,217
    edited 5 May
    My favourite combination of design and planting - formal, structured, hard landscaping with straight borders stuffed with a riot of blowsy cottage garden style planting.

    Hardy, geraniums, hostas, ferns, geums, alchemilla mollis, dicentra, brunnera - just some of my own 'go to' low height plants which do well in my own north facing garden.

    Just one note of caution - if those are buxus topiary dotted around, be a bit careful about allowing plants to flop on them. Apart from spoiling the effect of the topiary it can also be a recipe for the introduction of box blight. Try to surround those with plants which support themselves (eg hostas and ferns)
    Heaven is ... sitting in the garden with a G&T and a cat while watching the sun go down
  • valerierobertsvalerieroberts Posts: 591
    If it was my garden I would want those trees that are planted and the branches trained flat against the supports in a line along the fence. They are called pleached trees.  You can have them evergreen ,fruit trees or leafy trees that give privacy. Looking at the picture of your garden I think it’s lovely.Valerie
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 25,719
    Yes @KCMM09 a star jasmine would love that south facing wall and the white flowers would pick up the white roses.

    It's a bit late to be moving things now but if you water it well beforehand and dig out as much of the root ball as you can and plonk it carefully in a ready prepared hole improved with well-rotted manure, check it's at the same level as before, back fill and water generously.  You'll then need to keep it watered all thru this first growing season.

    Walls suck up lots of moisture and also make a rain shadow so do enrich the soil, don't plant too close to the wall and do water.  15L a time poured slowly so it soaks down.  Do this weekly till next autumn especially in hot and dry spells but not if you have biblical rain. 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • KCMM09KCMM09 WalesPosts: 72
    Obelixx said:
    Yes @KCMM09 a star jasmine would love that south facing wall and the white flowers would pick up the white roses.

    It's a bit late to be moving things now but if you water it well beforehand and dig out as much of the root ball as you can and plonk it carefully in a ready prepared hole improved with well-rotted manure, check it's at the same level as before, back fill and water generously.  You'll then need to keep it watered all thru this first growing season.

    Walls suck up lots of moisture and also make a rain shadow so do enrich the soil, don't plant too close to the wall and do water.  15L a time poured slowly so it soaks down.  Do this weekly till next autumn especially in hot and dry spells but not if you have biblical rain. 
    This is such good advice! Thanks so much !! 
  • KCMM09KCMM09 WalesPosts: 72
    Topbird said:
    My favourite combination of design and planting - formal, structured, hard landscaping with straight borders stuffed with a riot of blowsy cottage garden style planting.

    Hardy, geraniums, hostas, ferns, geums, alchemilla mollis, dicentra, brunnera - just some of my own 'go to' low height plants which do well in my own north facing garden.

    Just one note of caution - if those are buxus topiary dotted around, be a bit careful about allowing plants to flop on them. Apart from spoiling the effect of the topiary it can also be a recipe for the introduction of box blight. Try to surround those with plants which support themselves (eg hostas and ferns)
    Thank you :) 
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