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Gunnera Manicata

dennispymmdennispymm DorsetPosts: 4
I planted one in our bog-garden and it's done very well for the last 12 years or so.  When I say bog-garden, it's of my own making, only about 10-12" deep and lined with plastic sheet (punctured in places) with a timed watering system to keep it constantly damp. Works a treat but needs frost protection and feeding once in a while, I fold over the leaves and cover with a quilt. It grows to about 6 feet but is limited by the depth of soil. It is also surrounded by Tyfa Latifolia (great reed mace) and other bog plants. The plastic sheet prevents the nearby Phyllostachys Nigra Henosis (Bamboo) from spreading. My first attempt and as I am in my 7th decade I want easy maintenace, this has proved very successful.

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  • MarranMarran Posts: 159
    Mine is in the same set up (though I have to drench with a hose; next Spring I'm going to add some porous hose).    I haven't bothered to give it any winter protection last few years and it's been fine.  It got so big I was hoping for some die-back! This Spring I got my spade to it and reduced it.  (Glos).
  • Sounds great. We have 2 and they are treated in the winter by folding the leaves over the growns and using dead leaves as a mulch. They always get hit by the frosts in the spring as they want to grow early.
    How lucky you are not to have the bamboo spreading. We love bamboos but over the years the non evasive ones are now very evasive and we have to be very vigilant to keep them in check.
  • dennispymmdennispymm DorsetPosts: 4
    Ours got hit by the early frost but managed to get a large fleece (in fact 2 stapled together) which saved them. This happens most years but they look very happy and have spread nicely within the bog-garden.

    I have 3 different varieties of bamboo and it is only recently they have become slightly invasive.  One actually came up on the other side of our pond (about 15ft away) and another sprouted similarly in the other direction.  Cutting the suckers seems to have fixed it so far but no doubt others will appear sooner or later.  I planted them about 12 years ago so pleased with their behaviour so far (at least 12ft tall now) and they provide excellent cover and shade. I have made a "secret" pathway between them that leads past the Gunnera and out to a wild flower meadow and orchard... the grandkids love it. It just needs a Gypsy caravan to complete the experience!
  • dennispymmdennispymm DorsetPosts: 4
    Marran said:
    Mine is in the same set up (though I have to drench with a hose; next Spring I'm going to add some porous hose).    I haven't bothered to give it any winter protection last few years and it's been fine.  It got so big I was hoping for some die-back! This Spring I got my spade to it and reduced it.  (Glos).

    The porous hose is a good idea, on a timer. You are lucky with the frost, our first one died completely without protection.  It's suppose to be frost-hardy down to -8c but we are about 600ft above sea level and it can get a bit chilly! Never -8c though.
  • SydRoySydRoy Posts: 166
    I did have 2 G. Tinctoria in my bog garden but one got a bit too big so I reluctantly pulled it up.
    I think the other I can just squeeze in. 
    I actually wanted G . Manicata but garden centres seem to sell (either knowingly or not) mostly G. Tinctoria - and I was none the wiser at the time I bought mine.
    I've planted a lot Purple Loosestrife this year - great bog plant.
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