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Potted plants suggestions for small front garden

WildFlower_UKWildFlower_UK Cambridgeshire, UKPosts: 213
Hi all, hope you have been keeping well.

As you can see below, we have spent some of the summer ripping up the shrubs from our front garden (our neighbours garden just visible shows what ours was like).

We have started on the smaller side, and although it looks neater, I'd like to pop some large planters or containers on the slabs. But I have no idea what to fill them with! The front of our house is NW facing so only really get early morning and late evening sun. Although not covered with tree canopy, the area is out of direct sunlight for most the day.

I'd quite like something tall or voluminous, and something to soften the area, and am not particularly set on flowering plants. I dont think there are many grasses that would thrive in the shade?

All suggestions welcome! 

Posts

  • ERICS MUMERICS MUM Posts: 523
    I like Phormiums or Cordyline for their shape and effect.
  • TheGreenManTheGreenMan Tyne and Wear Green Belt Posts: 848
    On the slab closest to the house:

    How about something like a Choisya Sundance. It should turn a lime green in a spot with only a bit of sun.

    On the middle slabs:

    I have a New Zealand wind grass (Anemanthele lessoniana) in a corner of my yard. It gets sun for only a few hours each day and it performs really well. That would be a soft and floaty option. (Evergreen)
    How about a fern too? You could put an autumn fern there which would pick up the colours from the grass (pinks, reds, oranges and greens). (Evergreen)

    On the front slab: 

    Maybe some Heuchera. A red one, a yellow and a green to pick up the colours of the plants behind them? (Also evergreen) 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,404
    Sorry to put a dampener on your plans but have you thought about security?  Small front gardens with big pots are an easy target for thieves so you need to consider a system of chaining your pots down and/or security lights and prickly plants that aren't easy to handle which means not friendly near a front door either.

    For a shady site, hardy ferns, hardy fuchsias, skimmia (ericaceous compost), hydrangea paniculata (needs a lot of water), heucheras, hellebores and for summer colour, trailing fuchsias, begonias and impatiens which are not hardy.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • WildFlower_UKWildFlower_UK Cambridgeshire, UKPosts: 213
    Obelixx said:
    Sorry to put a dampener on your plans but have you thought about security?  Small front gardens with big pots are an easy target for thieves so you need to consider a system of chaining your pots down and/or security lights and prickly plants that aren't easy to handle which means not friendly near a front door either.
    Thanks for the advice! We live in a small cul-de-sac of 4 houses with no through route, off the main street in a village, so am hoping that we won't be too much of a target. Our neighbours have pots that haven't been taken, which is a good sign.

    And thanks to all for those suggestions. Many of the names I've not heard of so will take some time to look into them :smile:
  • WildFlower_UKWildFlower_UK Cambridgeshire, UKPosts: 213
    I was wondering whether bamboo in pots would work in this space? I read that some thrive in area without direct sunlight, and come in non spreading or invasive varieties, such as this: https://www.primrose.co.uk/3ft-fargesia-robusta-campbell-10l-pot-p-126611.html.
  • Ive had problems for years getting some plants to go either side of the door they kept dying. After doing some research it became apparent that because of the shelter given by the eves they were not getting enough water because I didnt think it was necessary as it rained so much. This year Ive planted skimmia Ive read theyre hardy and dont need a lot of attention so fingers crossed, maybe they would be suitable for you
  • WildFlower_UKWildFlower_UK Cambridgeshire, UKPosts: 213
    Hi @Mandy-. The location of the pots wouldn't under eaves as such, although they are within 2 metres of the house and so I definitely take onboard what you say about the rain shadow! Especially is we go down the bamboo route, as thy're thirsty plants.
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