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Echinops problem

The_herpetologistThe_herpetologist West YorksPosts: 481
hi guys. Can anyone hazard a guess as to what’s happening to my echinops such that they grow in this malformed way?


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  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,367
    It happens to mine too.
    I think it's aphids living in the tightly curled leaves - if I do nothing they don't flower but I find spraying once soon as I notice the leaves curling usually does the trick as when the leaves unfurl they don't seem to appear.
    Sometimes they need a 2nd spray.
    A systemic insecticide is needed as the bugs are well protected within the curled leaves.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,368
    There are a couple of possibilities - powdery mildew and/or aphids, both of which cause similar looking damage.  Look inside some of those curled-up leaves and see what you find.  When I zoom-in, I think I can see some typical white spots of powdery mildew so would put my money on that, especially as the weather this year has been perfect for its development.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,367
    I was a bit late spraying mine this year.
    You can see where the damage happened earlier in they year and I only sprayed once.
    Now the flowers are ok I'll let that ladybird have a feast :)

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • The_herpetologistThe_herpetologist West YorksPosts: 481
    Thanks guys, you nailed it.... there are indeed aphids in the leaves!
  • 1634 Racine1634 Racine Posts: 568
    I’ve got floppy nops this year.  They are heading in all directions with a big gap in the middle.  I’ve also got big discolouration in the foliage.  Luckily both these things aren’t majorly visible at they are back of border and the flowers still seem fine




  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,368
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • 1634 Racine1634 Racine Posts: 568
    Thanks Bob.  Very interesting.  I did have a look to see if there were any beasties.  Would make sense that I didn’t see any if they are mining the leaves!

    Kind go glad to see there are no recommended controls from RHS. I don’t want to be starting any new battles in the garden.  With any luck these miners might make a tasty treat for one of the more welcome garden visitors
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,368
    Yep, in general, leaf miners are untreatable but you can often lessen the chances of them appearing by burning etc. the old foliage at the end of the season because they pupate within the leaf cavities they have made.  Depends on how much they bother you, especially given that echinops tend to look generally tatty after flowering, anyway. :D
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
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