Unidentified plant in greenhouse

Can anyone tell me what this is that's growing in the greenhouse at my new house? It currently stands about 4ft high.
Many thanks
Nicola 

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Posts

  • PalustrisPalustris Posts: 3,135
    Shoo fly plant. Nicandra physalodes


  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 14,125
    I love them, got them self seeded all over the place. Must come from the compost as I only ever grew from seeds once. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Ah OK, thank you for your help. 
  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,201
    Nice plants - if you grow enough, some self sown seedlings will have variegated leaves as I discovered :)
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 17,110
    Love the idea of a plant that shoos flies but does it work?
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,201


    Obelixx said:
    Love the idea of a plant that shoos flies but does it work?

    I'd like to be able to say Yes - they clap their petals together when a fly lands on them  :D
    Never really noticed one way or another tho.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 14,125
    They’re very interesting plants, maybe they do shoo flies away.😀

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,201
    I like them Lyn - when one of mine self seeded outside the gate, several passers by asked if I would save some seeds for them.
    I don't remember ever seeing them suggested as Companion Planting but the name must have come from somewhere mustn't it ?
    Can't remember whether you had any last year ?  Perhaps set T to watch and report back ?  Or perhaps not - he won't spot much from the back of the sofa will he :D
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 14,125
    I could save some seeds if anyone wants them.
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 14,125
    Pinched off the net.

    In the southern U.S.A. the juice of the plant has been mixed with milk as a poisoned bait for houseflies and blow flies in the same way in which the crumbled caps of the fungus Amanita muscaria were used in parts of Europe. However, the flies were said to be killed outright, rather than merely stupefied, as in the case of the mushroom/milk infusion.
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

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