Bay Laurel Tree

KEEPGREENKEEPGREEN Posts: 29
Hi everybody,

I need your valuable assistance please.
I need some guidance in transferring the Bay Laurel tree, from the temporary plastic vase to a proper solid cement vase.

Just wanted to know what compost do I use in the vase
Where do I buy the compost from?
And once the Bay tree is potted, can I leave it out in the garden ? Or can I leave it indoors ? 

Thank you all. 


Posts

  • steephillsteephill Posts: 880
    edited 14 August
    I would use John Innes no. 3 compost. Note that this is a formula for compost rather than a brand name so you should find it at any decent garden centre or diy shed under a number of different brand names. It will be heavier than a similar volume of multipurpose compost so be careful when handling.

    It should go outside and the pot should have a decent drainage hole in the bottom. You might also need pot feet to raise it off the ground to help with drainage and avoiding frost damage.
  • I agree with @steephill that the bay should be outside, however if you do keep it outside @KEEPGREEN you will need a more substantial, heavy pot for the plant which at the moment is top heavy and will soon blow over in the wind if kept in a light plastic pot. Do you have an area outside where the plant could be moved to? Preferably somewhere sunny and sheltered if possible.
    I must add that the plant looks very healthy and is obviously thriving although you don't say how long you have owned it.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 14,139
    @KEEPGREEN. You say you’re going to put it in a concrete vase, what is that.? 
    It needs a large container. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Joy*Joy* Posts: 338
    It might be a good idea to give it a support to straighten its trunk. I'm currently making a holly pop tree from a rather leggy hedgehog holly. To keep the trunk straight I've splinted it with a thin cane and then wrapped soft twine around it to keep it straight.  You just have to monitor it to make sure that as the trunk grows you re apply the twine so that it remains just comfortably tight. Your tree certainly looks healthy  but it will need a heavy pot or it will blow over. I kept a bay in a pot for several years so that I could over winter it indoors as I thought that they were tender. After I planted it in the garden it grew to epic proportions, more than 20 meters high!
  • CeresCeres Posts: 1,776
    If your new pot is tall and thin you will still have the problem of the plant toppling over in the wind which is liable to cause damage to both plant and pot. It is best to plant it into something robust and heavy.
  • KEEPGREENKEEPGREEN Posts: 29
    steephill said:
    I would use John Innes no. 3 compost. Note that this is a formula for compost rather than a brand name so you should find it at any decent garden centre or diy shed under a number of different brand names. It will be heavier than a similar volume of multipurpose compost so be careful when handling.

    It should go outside and the pot should have a decent drainage hole in the bottom. You might also need pot feet to raise it off the ground to help with drainage and avoiding frost damage.
    Noted, Thank you very much . 
  • KEEPGREENKEEPGREEN Posts: 29
    I agree with @steephill that the bay should be outside, however if you do keep it outside @KEEPGREEN you will need a more substantial, heavy pot for the plant which at the moment is top heavy and will soon blow over in the wind if kept in a light plastic pot. Do you have an area outside where the plant could be moved to? Preferably somewhere sunny and sheltered if possible.
    I must add that the plant looks very healthy and is obviously thriving although you don't say how long you have owned it.
    Thank you very much, will certainly now seek a bigger pot since you mentioned. 
    It's just a week old, since i bought . 

  • KEEPGREENKEEPGREEN Posts: 29
    Lyn said:
    @KEEPGREEN. You say you’re going to put it in a concrete vase, what is that.? 
    It needs a large container. 
    Thank you - Will get a lager pot :-) 
  • KEEPGREENKEEPGREEN Posts: 29
    Ceres said:
    If your new pot is tall and thin you will still have the problem of the plant toppling over in the wind which is liable to cause damage to both plant and pot. It is best to plant it into something robust and heavy.
    Thank you - Will certainly seek a bigger pot. 
  • KEEPGREENKEEPGREEN Posts: 29
    Joy* said:
    It might be a good idea to give it a support to straighten its trunk. I'm currently making a holly pop tree from a rather leggy hedgehog holly. To keep the trunk straight I've splinted it with a thin cane and then wrapped soft twine around it to keep it straight.  You just have to monitor it to make sure that as the trunk grows you re apply the twine so that it remains just comfortably tight. Your tree certainly looks healthy  but it will need a heavy pot or it will blow over. I kept a bay in a pot for several years so that I could over winter it indoors as I thought that they were tender. After I planted it in the garden it grew to epic proportions, more than 20 meters high!
    Thank you for the tip , appreciated.
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