Plants just dumped in stores not looked after-Anyone notice this

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  • JacquimcmahonJacquimcmahon Paris FrancePosts: 319
    I have to disagree about banning the supermarkets from selling plants. In some areas that is now the only way to be able to buy plants. More and more there are no diy stores and garden centers are usually “out of town”.  Not everyone has a car or the ability to get there easily.

    the decision becomes either live in a sterile environment or accept that these plants can bring pleasure even if they require some tlc to get them going.

    My parents live in a Scottish town where both diy stores have now gone (heaven forbid you have a leaky tap!), if it was not for supermarket plants my mother would hate life. As an avid gardener she has to make do with these plants and still has a stunning garden. 

    Oh oh and honestly “on line” is not a real option for everyone either.....
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,737
    Conversely if it wasn't for supermarkets selling everything the specialist shops wouldn't go out of business. Now we're forced to buy inferior products because the supermarkets aren't specialists and stock cheap rubbish because that's what sells.
  • EricaheatherEricaheather North West uk Posts: 197
    To be quite honest, I wouldn't have so many bee friendly plants without the local super market. I think banning them from selling the plants is not a good idea at all. I buy as I shop, and wouldn't make the trip to the GC...They're all impulse buys. As @Jacquimcmahon says, not everyone has access to a car to get to a GC. Also walking past the plant sections   whilst doing shopping may encourage none gardeners to plant and grow more (start that gardening bug we all have!). Our local GC has a clearance corner that is shameful the state of some of the plants there. They can be both as bad as each other. but we shouldn't exclude anyone from having access to plants to help the bees and pollinators. And while there are still people like us who will snap up a bargain and save the poor things then thats great! My problem is I snap up far too many bargains and may need to move house if I carry on lol. 
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,737
    It seems that everyone forgot the neonicotinoid impregnated plant scandal very quickly when it comes to supermarkets. 'Bee friendly' plants laced with pesticides. Does anyone check if their supermarket has banned their use before impulse buying these days?
  • EricaheatherEricaheather North West uk Posts: 197
    No I don't. And will have to Google that scandal. My point is, the more access to plants there is, the better chance the bees have. There may be a lot of waste but also a lot of good comes out of it. Fine balance. But yes, supermarkets should look after plants more but not ALL are bad. Despite my bargain purchases, on the whole they are well looked after. And I will continue impulse buying
  • amancalledgeorgeamancalledgeorge South LondonPosts: 504
    Gosh @wild edges so much anger this morning...hope you found a shady spot in your garden to calm down. Guess what, we all have different lives and while lost of people like me have access to a car and drive for an hour to a specialist nursery most can only buy plants from the nearest multiple retailer before picking up their kids from sports or dance classes. Still better than having no access to plants. Wish they'd be better at sourcing and looking after plants...but such is life. 
    To Plant a Garden is to Believe in Tomorrow
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,737
    No I don't. And will have to Google that scandal. My point is, the more access to plants there is, the better chance the bees have. There may be a lot of waste but also a lot of good comes out of it.
    The scandal was that plants were being sold as 'bee friendly' while being laced with a systemic pesticide that poisoned bees and was already banned from agricultural use. The more plants that supermarkets sold, the more harm was done to bees by people thinking they were doing good. :/  B&Q took a strong stance to change how their plants were grown and Aldi too I think but I'm not sure if the change has been universal. I'm sure it wasn't a concious decision by the supermarkets to stock plants like that and I think even Wyevale were caught up in it to a certain extent.
  • yorkshireroseyorkshirerose North YorkshirePosts: 361
    How many Supermarket shoppers for plants ask where they are grown?
    Many will come in from abroad, carrying the risk of diseases such as Xylella.
    If there are any imported plants in good Garden Centres will have a passport number which can be traced back to the nurseries from which they came if there is a problem.
    More and more Garden Centres are turning theirs backs on imported plants and are suppporting British nurseries (apologies to forum members who do not live in Great Britain)
    Just out of interest, next time you buy from a Supermarket, ask if they know where the plants are grown. I know they do buy British too, but do they give the nurseryman a fair payment for all the hard work he has to put into raising the plants?

    A gardener's work is never at an end  - (John Evelyn 1620-1706)
  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,634
    Having read through this thread.  It can bee seen that all contributors have a real live passion for plants, it is, as if we can hear the mournful cries of wilfully neglected plants crying out.  Help me, save me.

    I would like to see legislation banning super markets from selling vegative plants.
    Vegative plants ?  
    Explanation needed I think.
  • JacquimcmahonJacquimcmahon Paris FrancePosts: 319
    Oops hope my comment did not dig me a hole.... or at least not one I can stitch a seedling in 🌱! Over here in France plants are often labeled with a flag showing country of origin I’m pretty sure I’ve seen that at Morrison’s in the uk too.
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