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Suggestions for light screening against a lovely Cotswold Stone wall?

We have a  4ft Cotswold stone wall which looks out onto a playing field and a quiet lane and we'd like to plant some light screening which allows us to still see the wall, which is beautiful, but provides light screening (not a hedge) against the lane/playing field which looks into our kitchen.  The soil is Cotswold Brash and there is already Sycamore trees at one end of the wall (see photo)  The wall is about 20 ft.  A range of interesting shrubs would be best we think - evergreen, deciduous, different colours etc.  Many thanks.
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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,949
    Have you thought of a hedge on stilts?  It involves pleaching which just means training branches horizontally from about 4 or 5 or 6 feet above ground to the height required to give shade or privacy.   It's used a lot on the continent to provide screening at bedroom window level without shading plants at the feet.

    Hornbeam, copper beech, linden and catalpa make good subjects and you'd be able to see all of your lovely wall except where the trunks stand.   This sort of thing - https://www.google.fr/search?q=pleached+hedges+images&rlz=1C1CHBF_frFR813FR813&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=N4AdQLfQfezh_M%3A%2C93mAKMJUxZBxlM%2C_&usg=AI4_-kRha6A5han2DlqBr5E-WPHhO3Fp4Q&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjhz7qrkYHfAhUP3RoKHTfzCLoQ9QEwAHoECAAQBA#imgrc=N4AdQLfQfezh_M

    Another solution wold be to stretch tensioned wires across tall fence posts and grow climbers along them to give you privacy.  There are roses and clematis that will suit the shady position if you beef up the soil with extra nutrients from well rotted compost and/or manure.   Plant at the ends away from the sycamore roots so they're not competing for moisture and nutrients.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Thanks Obelixx I have seen the pleached effect but we want something less formal, more like shrubs or small trees. Louise
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,949
    It'll be difficult under that sycamore and they'll hide the wall.  Best just to choose what you like that you know suits the soil then.

    Stretched wiring for a climbing or rambling rose can be very discreet and with an abundant flowering rose along it won't look at all formal.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 5,965
    Obelixx  is right, in that having the sycamore tree will make planting a bit difficult - aside from the roots, it will hoover up a lot of moisture. Would you be willing to make a large bed in front of the wall, bringing it out so that it incorporates the existing tree? This would make it much easier for the shrubs you plant in terms of both moisture and light, and also mean the wall would be a feature at the back of it.
  • RubytooRubytoo On the sofa, Southerly aspect.Posts: 1,185
    What about using tall posts with rope swags with climbers like roses and clematis on.
    Your wall is beautiful it would be a shame to have more than a tiny bit of it hidden.        (Sorry just my opinion of course it is your wall, just that I would kill for a wall like that :)


  • AnniD said:
    Obelixx  is right, in that haūving the sycamore tree will make planting a bit difficult - aside from the roots, it will hoover up a lot of moisture. Would you be willing to make a large bed in front of the wall, bringing it out so that it incorporates the existing tree? This would make it much easier for the shrubs you plant in terms of both moisture and light, and also mean the wall would be a feature at the back of it.
    Hi thanks yes we do really love the wall - but it leaves open to people looking into the house so we're looking for a solution.  Maybe a layered bed would work? Wish I could see what the clematis/rose option on wires would look like? We'd  need something for Winter cover too though
  • RubytooRubytoo On the sofa, Southerly aspect.Posts: 1,185
    edited December 2018
    Sorry no particular links but if you use a search engine put in, rose swags on ropes, it comes up with some nice images. Look on images rather than web options most searches have them I think.

    You can get winter flowering clematis also some late flowering ones with great bunches of very silvery decorative seed heads that stay all winter.
    Then you can cut the late ones like orientalis or tangutica ( not winter flowering, cos they will be flowering), just the group threes) back hard if you like to tidy them in spring.
    And a rose or two to carry on the display.

    Sorry Obelisk did not mean to go over your wire idea, just thought ropes might look nice. I have seen some manila ones go a nice all grey with grey posts would go well with that wall.
    Close up of a rope and (hefty) post detail, there are other smaller options available.
    https://wabbits.piwigo.com/picture?/82/category/5-a_tuesday_in_chichester

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,949
    The rope idea is good Ruby but, I think, a bit formal and also you have to get the right kind of rope and soak it before you swag it or it ends up being too taut.

    The advantage of the wires is that they are largely invisible form a distance but provide support for a good coverage from rambling roses and clematis and honeysuckle.  Using 1m deep strips of builders' metal mesh for reinforcing concrete would be good too.   

    Any shrub or tree planted at ground level to give privacy up to 6' high is going to mask the wall.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 4,990
    I think Obelixx has the right idea for what you need. An evergreen clematis  - like Clematis cirrhosa "Freckles" or "Winter Beauty" could be trained along the wire and would drape beautifully, along with a rambling rose perhaps.
  • RubytooRubytoo On the sofa, Southerly aspect.Posts: 1,185
    Good ideas too Lizzie27 but the pruning needs to be considered with winter clems and roses, though they could be kept a bit separated, individual sections?
    If the rose needs a prune then detangling or pruning cirrhosa/purpurascens etc end up cutting off flowering stems.
    I have a balearica at the moment crawling all over Penny Lane. I hate to do it but somethings gotta give :D
    Though think that Acuwell has probably got space for them better than me.
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