Apartment garden

ehanlonehanlon IrelandPosts: 7
Hi I have a 300 sq ft balcony. Sun all day...I would like to have flower beds but am unsure as to how over time plants will survive? I have a lot of pots wit old plants I have brought from my garden...i have downsized would anyone have any tips, thanks Emily

Posts

  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,323
    If your balcony is subject to windy conditions you will need to think of some type of protection for the plants in pots. Something that will filter the wind would be ideal.
    SW Scotland
  • ZeroZero1ZeroZero1 Posts: 564
    You would need to ask specific questions about specific plants to get exact answers, but even so, why not simply try everything you want. It's often true that plants survive where you think they would not. 
    The three essentials are right soil, right light and right watering. Most plants do well in rich soil, except wild flowers types and desert types. 
  • tessagardenbarmytessagardenbarmy York,North YorkshirePosts: 332
    A fairly recent Gardeners  World had a section on planting balconies in a development of  flats. Also the amazing apartment  blocks in Milan which have huge trees etc it's called the Boscale Verticalle should give you some ideas of what can be achieveled.  Have fun. 
  • ehanlonehanlon IrelandPosts: 7
    Joyce21 said:
    If your balcony is subject to windy conditions you will need to think of some type of protection for the plants in pots. Something that will filter the wind would be ideal.
    Thanks a mill Joyce for your info, Emily
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,336
    Before you bring in too many pots it would be sensible to check the load-bearing  capability of your balcony. 
    Also remember that you are responsible for ensuring that nothing falls and causes damage or injury. 
    But apart from the above considerations, there are lots of ways to garden on your balcony. What plants have you got already?
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ehanlonehanlon IrelandPosts: 7
    A fairly recent Gardeners  World had a section on planting balconies in a development of  flats. Also the amazing apartment  blocks in Milan which have huge trees etc it's called the Boscale Verticalle should give you some ideas of what can be achieveled.  Have fun. 
    A fairly recent Gardeners  World had a section on planting balconies in a development of  flats. Also the amazing apartment  blocks in Milan which have huge trees etc it's called the Boscale Verticalle should give you some ideas of what can be achieveled.  Have fun. 
    Hi Tess,yes Iv seen that episode and was also in Millan and seen the apartments, they where amazing, oh the excitement of new journeys, just downsized and moved two years ago, left my beautiful gardens but they are been tented to by another Gardner!!! Now need to create something beautiful, thanks for your help, have a good a day, Emily
  • ehanlonehanlon IrelandPosts: 7
    ZeroZero1 said:
    You would need to ask specific questions about specific plants to get exact answers, but even so, why not simply try everything you want. It's often true that plants survive where you think they would not. 
    The three essentials are right soil, right light and right watering. Most plants do well in rich soil, except wild flowers types and desert types. 
    Hi Zero, Yes think I will need to go to the garden centre and get pointers, thanks a miss for your answers. Warm Wishes Emily
  • ehanlonehanlon IrelandPosts: 7
    Before you bring in too many pots it would be sensible to check the load-bearing  capability of your balcony. 
    Also remember that you are responsible for ensuring that nothing falls and causes damage or injury. 
    But apart from the above considerations, there are lots of ways to garden on your balcony. What plants have you got already?
    Hi Dove from above!!! I have peony roses which are very old but are doing ok in the pots, hellebore, lupins, verbena lots of spring bulbs, digitalis (day lilies)  assortment of lilies, black eyed peas, Campanella granny's bonnets, dahlia and lots more. Emily  
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,230
    If you are quite high up, you will need to watch out for the wind. Plants that have large thin leaves will not last. Plants that require moisture for long periods in soils may not be suitable. Plants that are very tall may not survive long-term.

    If you have a cover or are in-set, you need to be ready to water the plants all through the year.

    Go with what you like first, and don't always follow the rule book. I had to learn the hard way. Plants that were always termed 'bomb proof' was not so form me, and plants that were never recommended in books did surprisingly well.


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