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Dry stone border edging

I have been thinking about creating a new border and considering what border edging would be best. Has anyone built a curved dry stone wall as edging for a slightly raised flower bed? Where would I get the stones from and how difficult is building a dry stone low wall? Any advice?

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 17,099

    WHERE DO YOU LIVE AND WHAT IS YOUR LOCAL STONE?

    HERE IN THE PEAK DISTRICT WE HAVE DRY STONE WALLS AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE.

    THERE ARE COURSES RUN TEACHING PEOPLE HOW TO BUILD THEM. THEY COME IN DIFFERENT STYLES ACCORDING TO THE STONE ETC.

    THEY ARE PRONE TO HARBOURING WILDLIFE (SNAILS) AND CAN SPONTANEOUSLY COLLAPSE IN A SHARP FROST.

    WE HAVE A FEW IN OUR GARDEN WHICH MY OH BUILT OUT OF THE LOCAL STONE.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,878

    I've built a few but as PF says, they are made from the stones that come out of the ground when you dig a hole anywhere in my garden. It's a handy way to use up the stones, but I'm not sure it's worth importing stones if you don't have them lying around. They do have their issues, as PF says - the slugs love them, as do mice and other creatures, and you have to know what you're doing to get them to stay standing up, especially with soil behind them.

    It might be cheaper to get a local brickie to build you a wall than to buy the stone. But if you really want to go the natural stone route, you need to find the nearest quarry to you and ask the how much they charge. DEFINITELY don't buy stones from a garden centre. It can be worth asking your local builders' merchant as they may have a good rate agreed with the local quarry and may have more flexible delivery options.

    “This isn't life in the fast lane, it's life in the oncoming traffic.”
    ― Terry Pratchett
  • Just looked at Flexi-Border Edging. Anyone used this? 

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 63,383

    I prefer an edging which is below the level of the grass to facilitate easier mowing.  Raised edges are a nuisance and I try to avoid them if I possibly can. 

    I try to avoid creating a raised bed in a lawn unless it's unavoidable ... we have one as it's supporting a high bank.  

    Last edited: 20 February 2018 11:25:58

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 26,104

    Might a dry stone edging to a border become a nightmare to weed?

    Just a thought.

    Devon.
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  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,992

    You would have to strim the grass up to the wall which is a pain. 

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 2,042

    Like Raisingirl, we have walls where there are changes in level and they are made from stones dug out of the ground. Buying stone is very expensive. My husband really enjoyed building the walls and said it wasn't difficult. The dogs use them as launch pads and our grandchildren clambered all over them with only minor damage. they do indeed harbour slugs but also lots of other wildlife,

  • thank you all for your advice. As it's going to be a flower border, I think I'll refrain from a dry stone wall after reading your comments about slugs etc. I'll need to re think my project and do more research into border edging. Maybe consider the Flexi edging.

    diolch yn fawr i chi gyd.

  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 2,042

    You're in Wales! Plenty of dry stone walls there.

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