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Botrytis questions

Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453

Hi

Some of my tomatoes succumbed to botrytis in the greenhouse this year, a result of too many plants in too small a space in a miserable summer in Aberdeenshire

I'm just clearing the last plants out of the greenhouse and want to know how cautious I need to be

Is it ok to put affected remains on the compost heap?

Alternatively if I cut off affected stems can I put the remains on the compost heap?

Is it now a good idea to do a deep clean in the greenhouse and if so should I use any particular product?

Finally I am moving a pepper plant indoors in a last ditch attempt to get the fruit to ripen. It had a few affected buds which I have snipped off and the rest of the plant looks ok. Should I still be careful to keep it away from a chilli plant already indoors?

Grateful for collective wisdom as ever

Last edited: 20 October 2017 17:30:16

Posts

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 20,209

    I throw it all away but I’ve just read a book by an old gardener called Garden Myths, and he says if he does get any  he puts it all in his compost bin, and always has done,  he says it’s air borne not soil borne, I wouldn’t take the chance.

    I assume you’re talking about Blight?

    i don’t know about changing soil in the GH I’ve never had blight.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 20,209

    So do you now use it for composting Edd?

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Stephanie newish gardenerStephanie newish gardener Aberdeenshire/Moray coastPosts: 453

    Just to confirm, the greenhouse has a concrete base, no bed, everything goes in pots.

    The floor needs a scrub anyway as I couldn't clean out the silt that was left after a flood in June, and that probably contributed to botrytis conditions. The silt is only from the river, there is no sewage in it, so that's not an issue

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