Wild Flower Meadow

I am thinking ahead for next year and have a small patch of grass at the entrance to the driveway(see below) that I would like to turn into a little wildflower patch, particularly poppies and cornflowers and other pretty flowers.

It does open onto open farmland and already the grass has a mixture of some wild grasses in it anyway so it couldn't be called a lawn.

Anyway, what would I need to do to make the transformation, I have seen sacks of wildflower seeds in my local garden centre but what about ground preparation, when and how? 

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Thank you for any advice and guidance. image

The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies.

— Gertrude Jekyll
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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 14,854

    After a lot of messing about and trying to cut corners I found that it is best to bite the bullet and dig the whole lot over and then reseed with a grass and flower seed mix. I tried digging little patches and putting the flower seeds in them but the established grass just took all the light and water before the flowers could grow big enough to compete.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,020

    Hi DD The first thing is to decide what sort of meadow you want. The poppy/cornflower/bright colour mixes are not those that grow in a grass meadow. They need cultivated soil, they naturally grew in fields with crops before herbicides were invented.

     

     

  • I was rather hoping for poppies and cornflowers mixed in with some grasses. 

    The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies.

    — Gertrude Jekyll
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,020

    They'll do nicely with annual grasses but not so well in established grassland

    You could scrape some patches in the grass, sow, and see what happens. Might be goodimage

  • chickychicky SurreyPosts: 8,346

    Do you watch Beechgrove DD?  They have had some spectacular results with annual wild flower mixes sown on cleared ground this April - i'm sure their website will have details.  As Nut says though, they started with a bare patch of prepared soil.

    We did not inherit the earth from our grandparents.  We’re borrowing it from our children.
  • chickychicky SurreyPosts: 8,346

    http://www.beechgrove.co.uk/factsheets

    Here you go - details on page 4 of the 13th August factsheet

    We did not inherit the earth from our grandparents.  We’re borrowing it from our children.
  • Dave MorganDave Morgan Posts: 3,123

    Having created wildflower beds and meadows for clients, I've found the best way so far is clearing the ground in early spring with weed killer. After a week the weeds will have absorbed the weedkiller and I dig it over as preparing for a new lawn. Rake to a fine tilthe and then sow your preferred seed mix. Lightly raking the seed into the soil. A good watering and then let it get on with it.

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     This was done in a prepared bed and is still in flower now. It has already self seeded and will be cut in a few weeks time.

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,020

    Nice one Daveimage

  • Thank you all, that does look rather lovely Dave, will spend the winter now building up my muscles ready to clear the ground. imageimage

    The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies.

    — Gertrude Jekyll
  • Fishy65Fishy65 Posts: 2,164

    DD - try corn cockle too (agrostemma githago). I've found it one of the most reliable of the cornfield annuals image

    What a gorgeous display Dave!!

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