Happy Easter - know your bunnies

Happy Easter to all gardeners and your bunnies x

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  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 22,221

    they're all just a form of vermin. I'd not want any in my garden.

    I'd also say I take real offence at the term " Poof Loof"

    Devon.
  • TootlesTootles Posts: 1,469

    Oh Hosta fan. I'm so sorry you don't like rabbits and that you take offence. It wasn't intended and I don't really understand that bit of your post but I hope your Easter hasn't been ruined by it.  

  • GemmaJFGemmaJF Posts: 1,197

    Awww so cute. image 

    My son had a rabbit called Rabbity when he was little. The mixture of what came from the unmentionable bit under the Flufferbuttle and the bedding made the most heavenly compost imaginable. It was the best couple of years ever for grass snakes laying eggs in the compost, that stuff cooked up some heat. image The 'Booblesnoot' imageyou've made my day Tootles. It's raining (again) and it's a H****W**K day, I needed cheering up. image

  • Oooh Hostafan you must have had a bad day????????(best smilies I can accessimage lost my top bar again) I have a constant battle with wild bunnies but they look nothing like Tootles piccy and a boot up their flufferbuttle would be more my idea .

    Happy Easter Toots -& Hosta (maybe not enough garden therapy yesterday)

    Choccy bunnies from that choc shop now that's a different thing all together???????????????? yum.
  • lol the picture made me smile, pretty sure the term 'Poof Loof' is not meant in an offensive way.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 56,566

    Sadly the formerly quite common and acceptable use of the 'p' word (particularly with reference to magicians' rabbits in hats etc) has been overtaken by its use as a derogatory and insulting term http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/poof  and many people understandably take exception to it because of that connotationimage They may not be aware of its other usage, possibly because they're too young image

    To move back to the Easter Bunny - he was totally unknown to me as a child.  This is a very interesting article http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2011/apr/23/easter-pagan-roots

    I've seen several magnificent March (and April) hares in the fields on my travels through Norfolk and Suffolk over the past few days. image

    My daughter had a fluffy blue rabbit to take to bed with her when she was little - his name was 'Ah-Ber' (short for Ah Bunny!image  she was very little).  When she was a bit older she had a pet rabbit called Mouse (another story) - she used to take him to bed with her too! image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 22,221

    Right, I'm sorry I was grumpy. 

    End of a long day.

    FYI we actually have an entire rabbit warren on our land. I don't kill them or harm them in any way. We also have foxes living here and they seem to keep things in balance. 

    I don't want them in the proper "garden" bit of the garden though.

    Still friends? image

    Devon.
  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 13,864

    The ground here is too rocky, limestone, for rabbits, but we have hares and deer instead.

    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • GemmaJFGemmaJF Posts: 1,197
    Dovefromabove wrote (see)

     

    To move back to the Easter Bunny - he was totally unknown to me as a child.  This is a very interesting article http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2011/apr/23/easter-pagan-roots

     

    That seems like a bit of a biased an inaccurate article there Dove. There are literally hundreds of links to the 'Easter Bunny' in Celtic tradition, of course in different guises, the most obvious belonging to the Lutherans who had the 'hare' as a the symbol, he was a bit like Father Christmas, and would judge if the children had been good or bad.

    It was the linking of the Easter Bunny with bringing Easter Eggs which I think is valid to say was later and probably derived in the US  in the 18th century from German immigrants. This is the 'Osterhase' but both elements  have much deeper and long traditional roots in Celtic (or pagan if the term must be used) tradition. Clearly though the immigrants were bringing with them long held beliefs and traditions.

    Happy 'Eastertide'. image

     

     

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,120

    Happy Easter Tootles, a very cute bunny photo. image

    Sadly our Benjamin Bunny is now residing in a Dr Martens box 3ft under but he is topped off with a lovely buddleia.

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