Composting in a tiny patio garden

josusa47josusa47 Posts: 2,347

For 14 years I had only a tiny patio garden, and I suffered pangs of compost withdrawal, every time I put a banana skin or cauliflower leaves in the landfill bin.  Until my mother bought me a pair of reclaimed chimney pots for my birthday.  I found two plant saucers that would sit comfortably in the top of them, and stood potted plants in them.  Every day I lifted off the plant to put my kitchen scraps in the chimney, along with shredded paper, torn cardboard, annual weeds etc, and an occasional dose of freshly-voided urine.  They produced beautiful compost, without any turning.  When one was full, I emptied the other and began filling it again.  The process was invisible, odourless and provided food and habitat for a range of invertebrates that found their way in.  I also dropped in any slugs and snails I found on the plants.

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 26,039

    Somewhat expensive to use for compost bins  image

    A plastic dustbin or even a small  kitchen bin would be ideal if you only have a small space. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • WillDBWillDB Posts: 1,884

    If you've only got a tiny patio, everything has to look good though Fairy. I'd rather look at a chimney pot with a potted plant on top than a plastic dustbin, wouldn't you? I think it's a great idea :)

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 26,039

    I totally agree Will - I'd much rather look at that too - but I don't think it would be top of my list as a choice, bearing in mind the cost of them! image

    The timber beehive ones are very smart, but also pricey.   If anyone's handy with a saw and a screwdriver - they could fashion a timber outer for a plastic bin too. In fact, I might even adopt that idea myself!  image 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 2,347

    The chimney pots were a gift, bought with the idea that I'd grow plants directly in them.  The idea of using them for composting came later, after a visit to the Centre for Alternative Technology, in Machynlleth, North Wales, where they have lots of whizzo ideas for composting.  I probably wouldn't have bought them for myself, but I have a generous Mum!  And they weren't that costly either, I think she haggled the seller down to £25 for the two.  But that was about 15 years ago. 

Sign In or Register to comment.