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Teasel

B3B3 Posts: 15,476

The teasel collects water in the leaves cupped around its stem.

Does this serve any function?

In London. Keen but lazy.
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  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 16,765

    Nice for the birds? 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • B3B3 Posts: 15,476

    Or the mozziesimage

    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • I've been wondering this as mine have collected quite a bit, and it's not particularly pretty as it's a bit brown now. I didn't know whether I should knock it out or not!

  • wakeshinewakeshine Posts: 964

    Collects insects, and also birds can drink the water (and the insects if they want).

    I really want some teasels. I bought one last year and hoped it would seed around but it didn't. Can't find them for sale anywhere, even at the wildlife place I got them from last year. Any ideas?

  • I grew mine from seed last year. I didn't realise at the time how big they would grow or that they wouldn't flower until this year. They look like they will be worth the wait though as they are huge!

    I can't remember ever seeing them for sale as plants though. Maybe the internet?

  • I also just found this online about the water collection:

    Conversely, on top of being a fantastic home for wildlife, the fuller’s teasel is also thought to be partially carnivorous. A cup-like formation is formed where each leaf meets the stem, collecting rainwater. Insects are often caught and killed in these vessels, and studies have shown that the plants with the most dead insects produce the most flowerheads. 

  • B3B3 Posts: 15,476

    Gg. I wondered if that was the case 

    Wakeshine they take two years to grow. They will be very small now. They will look very much like primula seedlings - which makes weeding a bit difficult.

    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • wakeshinewakeshine Posts: 964
    B3 says:

    Wakeshine they take two years to grow. They will be very small now. They will look very much like primula seedlings - which makes weeding a bit difficult.

    See original post

     Oh. Thank you. Well if I had put it on the opposite side of the garden, I wonder if any could have gone to the other side - because the other side has a lot of primula type seedlings.  I assumed they are all from cowslips but perhaps there could be some there!

    I will check internet from the seeds. Are they hard to germinate and how do you do this?

  • I sewed mine in April last year (although I think you can sew between Feb and June). I sewed onto seed compost and covered with vermiculite. I think the packet said to put in a propagator, but I just left open in the greenhouse. However, Guernsey is fairly mild. 

    I found that they nearly all germinated like this, although I'm sure there are people on here with more expertise than me!!

  • wakeshinewakeshine Posts: 964

    Thanks GuernseyGreenie. I will try and get hold of some seeds! No Greenhouse for me though.

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