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Wildlife garden

Hi all. I'm new to this site and wondered if anyone could advise me on any steps I might take to make my small gardens ( front and back) more wildlife friendly.

I was delighted the other day to see gold finches for the first time on my bird feeder, which has only occurred since swapping multi mix bird seed to sunflower hearts.

It's got me thinking if there are any other changes I could make like ditching the peanut feeder for something else etc.

Kind regards, Lottelou

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Posts

  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 35,474

    Hello Lottelou and welcome to the forum. You will find lots of helpful tips by clicking on this link.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/22433553

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,848

    the biggest things you can do for wildlife are dumping any chemicals and not being too tidy, (leave seed heads on, piles of sticks that creature can hide in etc) and accessible water, shallow for insects to drink. Lots of other things but that's a start.

  • LottelouLottelou Posts: 6

    Hi Ladybird4, thank you for the link. Appreciated.

  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 35,474

    You are most welcome.

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,129

    I agree ... water will bring lots of wildlife ......... I've just spent half the afternoon laying on my tum watching frogs, newts, waterboatmen, pond snails and damselflies  in and around our little pond.  

    While I was doing that robins, starlings and blackbirds were taking turns to have a bathe in the shallow end image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • LottelouLottelou Posts: 6

    Hi nutcutlet, thanks for your reply. I can certainly be less tidy without difficulty.

  • LottelouLottelou Posts: 6

    Hi dovefromabove. I do have a small pond ( very small, more a puddle really) but the lady blackbird takes a bath and we have an odd frog in there so good to know its useful.Thank you for your reply.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,129

    I know it's not expensive ... but all ads on this site have to be paid for ... contact the Gardeners World website team ... contact details at the foot of the page. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • RedwingRedwing SussexPosts: 1,304

    So much good advice already. Agree with Nut; dump the chemicals. Dig a pond: that's the biggest thing you can do. Don't give up the peanut feeder; many birds like them.  And there is lots of good advice in this book.  I think it may be out of print at the moment but surely someone has a secondhand copy.  It is an excellent resource and I really recommend it.  Try the library if all else fails. 

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/RSPB-Gardening-Wildlife-AdrianThomas/dp/B00GPOB39M/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1495477241&sr=1-3&keywords=adrianthomas

    The only further thing I would add is to plant as many pollinating insect friendly plants as you have room for, especially the earliest and latest flowering plants when there isn't much else around. 

    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
  • Mark56Mark56 Windsor, BerkshirePosts: 1,653

    Agree with everyone else re: chemicals & using organic, natural methods. You can also cut a 5" hole in your fence to allow hedgehogs to pass through, in turn they will reward you with eating garden pests. If you want to go the whole way you could also supply cat biscuits via a feeding station. image

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