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Ideas for a 38m hedge

S110S110 Posts: 11

imageHi all, We've got a 38m long boundary with an ugly wall and fence, that we want to hide behind a fast-growing hedge. I'm wondering if a hedge that long in all privet would just be too much green, and I've been looking at mixing in things like golden privet/red robin/firethorn but can't decide how to do it so it works together nicely. What do you think? Would welcome all thoughts and ideas! Thanks everyone!

Last edited: 20 May 2017 21:49:42

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,550

    I WOULD GO FOR A HEDGE MADE UP OF NATIVE PLANTS SUCH AS HAWTHORN, BLACKTHORN, FIELD MAPLE, HORNBEAM, DOG ROSE ETC. MUCH MORE OF A NORMAL MIXTURE AND MORE LIKELY TO GROW AT A SIMILAR PACE AND TO BLEND IN TOGETHER. ALSO MUCH BETTER FOR WILD LIFE. FLOWERS, BERRIES, DENSE TWIGGY GROWTH IDEAL FOR BIRDS' NESTS ETC.

    TAKE A LOOK AT HEDGES DIRECT'S WEBSITE.  THEY DO BULK PURCHASES SUITABLE FOR A LONG HEDGE. YOU MIGHT HAVE TO WAIT UNTIL AUTUMN TO PLANT THEM THOUGH. STILL, THAT LEAVES YOU PLENTY OF TIME TO GET THEIR SITE IN GOOD CONDITION.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • daffygardenerdaffygardener Posts: 109

    Yep that's what I would suggest too, they will take a couple of years to get into their stride, but then will be really good, and is easy to replace if you have any losses If it's mixed. If you've got blackthorn, rose hips, elder flower and berries, you've got the makings of a good harvest too for making stuff, including the winter tipples. I'd add in the odd holly too, then that's Christmas decorations taken care of. 

    The only problem with fast growing is it continues to grow fast when 'its  got to the height you want it to reach, so will be tough to maintain and keep in check. 

    If the wall in the picture is the one you want to hide - how close to the wall do you want to plant? And is it your wall? If it's not yours, you may be obliged to allow space for occasional Maintenance. Right next to the wall any hedge might take longer to get established And need more TLC. 

  • S110S110 Posts: 11

    Thanks for your suggestions! I'll look into that about the wall. The only thing with those being deciduous is that we'll be back to the ugly wall and fence all through the winter... any thoughts on how to make it work with evergreen varieties?

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,550

    ONCE SOMETHING SUCH AS BLACKTHORN OR HAWTHORN GETS ESTABLISHED YOU CAN'T SEE PAST THE FIRST FEW INCHES.

    THERE'S A PUBLIC FOOTPATH SIGN NEAR MY HOUSE WHICH IS IN THE MIDDLE OF A BLACKTHORN BUSH AND NOBODY CAN EVER FIND IT.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • RedwingRedwing SussexPosts: 1,240
    S110 says:

    Thanks for your suggestions! I'll look into that about the wall. The only thing with those being deciduous is that we'll be back to the ugly wall and fence all through the winter... any thoughts on how to make it work with evergreen varieties?

    See original post

     Mix in a few privet as well to hide the ugliness. Native hedges will thicken up given time and space.  I absolutely agree with mixed hedge suggestion.  Over the years I have planted a kilometre or two of mixed hedge.  They really are wonderful, don't forget to include wild roses and I would include hazel too.  It will be good for wildlife. I have bought from Buckingham Nurseries and they are good.  Wait until November and bare rooted plants become quite cheap. I have no connection with them other than as a customer.

    Based in Sussex, I garden to encourage as many birds to my garden as possible.
  • LoxleyLoxley NottinghamPosts: 4,640

    Russet leaves cling to trimmed beech/hornbeam hedges all winter. Don't go for privet; very boring and seems to constantly need trimming. 

  • LoxleyLoxley NottinghamPosts: 4,640

    Another option would be to train pyracantha against the wall and fence, rather than growing as a hedge. Would save on garden space. Wouldn't mix golden privet in with it, I think it's better to have an unobtrusive smart backdrop rather than one that shouts for attention. 

  • daffygardenerdaffygardener Posts: 109

    How about hydrangea peteilaris against the wall? Doe too any damage to the brickwork and will cover it 

    have seen a lovely hedge of mixed pyracantha with orange and red berries. Prickly so a good security barrier. 

  • S110S110 Posts: 11

    Thank you, those are very good suggestions. Yes I think you're right about avoiding anything too loud - I googled mixed hedges and came up with green/yellow/red stripes and that's really what I want to avoid. I'm now thinking perhaps different TEXTURES of green to mix it up.

    I don't know if you can see well enough in the photo but down by the gate is a low wall so pyracantha would work well there for security, and the berries are lovely.

    I'm very keen on climbing hydrangea idea - but the wall is our neighbour's so is there an issue there with planting things up it?

    Thanks all, this is a big help!

    Last edited: 22 May 2017 21:37:08

  • daffygardenerdaffygardener Posts: 109

    That's good now you know what you don't want.  Anything against your neighbours wall that would damage or that would undermine their foundations wouldn't probably be recommended.  You could put trellis fencing near the wall or fencing and grow climbers through and on it. Alternatively have you asked your neighbour if they would mind you putting a trellis on the wall? You've a small gap between the drive and the wall/fence and wouldn't want anything to grow over toward the drive too much, anything too prickly might scratch paintwork and wouldn't be comfortable getting out of a car against. The hydrangea doesnt have suckers or grow into the wall so won't damage it.and will flower. I think there is a difference between growing things near the wall, and attaching things to the wall. Attaching anything would need permission, growing something near the boundary on your property wouldn't. The foundations of the wall and building are likely to be dry and as it's a narrow space is likely to need support in watering to get it established. Against the fence is different. The pyracantha is very pruneable to a narrow profile and is good for security. Berberis would also be the same. It would stand upright on its own so no need to attach to you neighbours wall for support. 

    How about posts near the block of wall with straining wires across  to grow fruit trees along them? Getting the benefit of the warmth and protection from the wall but not against it? Treating the bit down near the gate differently to the blank wall and the the bit by the fencing? 

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