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Where have my bluebells Gone?

Last autumn I planted 120 bluebell bulbs (non scripta,  not spanish) in our fruit garden (apples, pears, cherry, plums, gooseberries and blueberries). There is no sign of any of them. Any ideas to what may have happened?

We do have mice, they love my tulips, but shouldn't they leave bluebells alone, I can't see any sign of them being dug up by rodents our other animals.

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,047

    They may have rotted, but as they like damp ground, that's unlikely. Squirrels possibly. Did they flower, or just not come up at all? 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,365

    Bluebells are bulbs that don't like being dug up, bagged and sold dry for autumn planting. As with snowdrops, many people are disappointed with the results. If you want some, get them now, as they die down, plant them straight away and water them in

  • Thanks fairy girl and nutcutlet 

    That part of the garden is on a slope, and moist but  well drained as there is a natural pond lower down in the garden. 

    I live in Denmark,  so in the green aren't so easy to get hold of, but I'll keep my eyes open. I'm lucky enough to have plenty of snowdrops which were transplanted in the green, which are naturalising really well. And I do have bluebells in other parts of the garden, but having inherited them with the garden, I suspect they are Spanish,  rather than non scripta.  My aim is a mini bluebell wood sort of look, so that when our fruit trees have matured it will hopefully look stunning.

    I am wondering if they're just a bit slow, as we do have it colder that most of the UK , probably more like north of England,  southern Scotland. 

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,862
    nutcutlet says:

    Bluebells are bulbs that don't like being dug up, bagged and sold dry for autumn planting. As with snowdrops, many people are disappointed with the results. If you want some, get them now, as they die down, plant them straight away and water them in

    See original post

     I'm not going to disagree with you in any way but, did anyone see the A-Z of the Nations Favourite Flowers programme on TV. 'S' was for Snowdrops, and they interviewed someone from an RHS garden who said they do not dig them up in the green  because it damages the roots, so they dig them and replant in the Autumn.

    myabe they don't practice what they preached. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Lyn, all I can say is I've tried buying snowdrop bulbs as soon as they come in the shops, and planting directly with nothing to show for it, and I've  moved snowdrops in the green where they've settled in straight away. I suppose if you dig them up in the autumn and replant straight away, you might get away with it, but it's impossible to know how long the ones in the shops have been above ground. My main problem with moving them in the autumn is knowing exactly where to dig.

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,365

    I think it probably is more about drying out than timing. I think the real Galanthophiles have settled on summer now but. like DP, I'd never find mine then. Mine aren't individually labelled and didn't cost £400 a bulb.

  • Good news, turns out I just had to be patient!

    My bluebells  have just started to flower! Strangly the spanish bluebells I inherited with the house are over now. 

    Thanks for your kind replies,

  • ClaringtonClarington Posts: 4,949

    Brilliant news!

  • oakridgeoakridge Posts: 83

    I am surprised about bluebells liking moist soil because because the woods at the back of our house are on very dry, sandy, acid ground and they produce a fantastic crop in the Spring.  They are an absolute weed in our garden.  We do dig them up when they are just going over because they are easier to find and give loads away.

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