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Can anyone identify this plant/ivy?

Found this growing in the garden this year, never seen before. Can anyone identify? Is it poisonous? It kind of looks like ivy, although it is growing along the ground.

image

Many thanks

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Posts

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,542

    It's some sort of dead nettle

    quite harmless and easy to pull out if you don't like it, but it does spread quickly

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Thanks for the reply Pete8 . It was the white patches that had me concerned, kind of looks like a warning.

    Last edited: 14 May 2017 14:01:03

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,441

    Yes, one of the lamiums ... pretty things ... I've planted lots in this garden 'cos it's great in shade .. yes it spreads, but that's what I want it to do ... it's easy enough to pull up if it spreads too far ... it's not a thug and it's one of the prettiest things to grow under trees.

    http://www.crocus.co.uk/plants/_/lamium-maculatum-beacon-silver/classid.3133/ 

    image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,709
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • Thanks Dovefromabove . Although looking at your photo mine looks slightly different, not white all over but just in patches, and no purple flowers with mine either.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,441

    Silver Surfer image  Vigorous yes ... weed not in my garden image 

    I've got that one as well as 'Beacon Silver'.  I like them both and both are easy to control. 

    Never paid £4.95 for a weed https://gardenshop.telegraph.co.uk/lamium-galeobdolon-variegatum/prod25002 

    Last edited: 14 May 2017 15:48:21

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,441
    Northern Gardener says:

    Thanks Dovefromabove . Although looking at your photo mine looks slightly different, not white all over but just in patches, and no purple flowers with mine either.

    See original post

     Sorry, I misled you.  I didn't mean yours was 'Beacon Silver' ... just that that is one of many different varieties of lamiums.  

    I have one which looks very like yours and has yellow flowers, but it's not blooming yet ..... 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Thanks Silver surfer . That's looks more like it, just followed your link and it seems to show the same plant. Thanks to all replies.

    Can be planted intentionally it says on wikipedia, although mine seems to wild.

  • Dovefromabove says:
    Northern Gardener says:

    Thanks Dovefromabove . Although looking at your photo mine looks slightly different, not white all over but just in patches, and no purple flowers with mine either.

    See original post

     Sorry, I misled you.  I didn't mean yours was 'Beacon Silver' ... just that that is one of many different varieties of lamiums.  

    I have one which looks very like yours and has yellow flowers, but it's not blooming yet ..... 

    See original post

     Oh, right. thanks. Just glad it is nothing to worry about.

  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,709

    Dovefromabove...

    It may well depend on where you live...whether soil is acid or not./sun or shade.

    I can only speak from expereience.

    We grow several beautiful  named Lamium without any problem.

    The yellow archangel we inherited..... Left alone it spread to form a patch maybe 20ft across...nothing elso grew there.

    Plantlife also concider it to be a problem. See...

    http://www.plantlife.org.uk/uk/discover-wild-plants-nature/plant-fungi-species/variegated-yellow-archangel

    Quote link above...

    "An invasive, non-native plant.This innocent looking relative of the dead-nettles produces spreading stems (stolons) with beautifully variegated leaves and spikes of yellow flowers. It’s very common as a garden plant and widely sold.

    What's the problem?

    Once this species gets into the wild, it rapidly spreads and carpets the floor to the exclusion of other plants. The smallest stolon fragment with just one pair of leaves can grow into a new colony, and stolons break readily if the plant is pulled up. It’s usually found in shady habitats such as woodland edges, hedgerows, roadside banks and stream sides. It is increasing rapidly in the wild and beginning to impact sites at which species of conservation interest grow; in a recent survey it was found at the majority of Spreading Bellflower Campanula patula sites visited.

    Rapid Risk Assessment

    ***** Critical RiskThis species is listed on Schedule 9 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act in England and Wales therefore, it is also an offence to plant or otherwise cause to grow these species in the wild."

    .....................................................................

    Some plants sold by nurseries are  very invasive wild flowers...sadly it doesn't make it right to sell them..

    Last edited: 14 May 2017 16:04:40

    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
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