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Steep bank on to woodland

Hi everyone, new to this site but we are buying a bungalow with a steep bank at the back leading on to a lovely adventurous woodland garden. 

We love the garden but would like to push the bank back away from the bungalow to make a larger patio area.

Any ideas on how to do this or how to design this.  There are steps going up either side to another patio higher up but we're looking for ideas on the part which is too close to the bungalow!

Would really appreciate any ideas or comments. Thank you!imageimageimage

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Posts

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 4,045

    Unless you have tons of money and access for a digger, the previous owners have done the best they can. To move that bank away from the house would mean building a humungous retaining wall which ain't cheap (we are talking many thousands and you would need the services of a structural engineer) and from the pics would be as high as the roof of your house. Is that what you want? or can afford?

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • susanroutsusanrout Posts: 6

    Thanks for reply.  We have a bit of money and can get a digger but that's my concern that the retaining wall would be so high pushing it back - unless we can design it such that it's a feature and interesting - prepared to throw some money at it but not quite sure how!

  • Dave HumbyDave Humby HampshirePosts: 1,131

    An option might be to go back to a point where the young chap is i.e. half-way into the bank. This would create more flat space for your patio extension and keep the height of the retaining wall down. But, as hogweed rightly says, something like this needs very expert opinion from a structural engineer rather than well-meaning enthusiasts on a garden forum ?

  • susanroutsusanrout Posts: 6

    Thanks Dave and Hogweed - I agree we may have to look for a structural engineer - my son thinks it would be ideal for a hobbit house to be embedded within the bank but that is huge work - also thinking of building a terrace from the roof out across the bank - early days but daunting work ahead!

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 4,045

    If you built a terrace from the roof out to the bank it would leave all the rooms facing the bank in virtual darkness!

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • susanroutsusanrout Posts: 6

    Good point hogweed - if you do see anything that might work for our garden in the next couple of months, please post a picture as we're moving there end June ? Enjoy this sunny day ?

  • LoxleyLoxley NottinghamPosts: 4,647

    Agree with the other comments - creating intermediate terraces is going to be more feasible than cutting right into the bank from threshold level, which would result in a vast retaining wall. And you will need an engineer's input; don't want the whole thing collapsing like the Aberfan disaster.

  • LoxleyLoxley NottinghamPosts: 4,647

    You could have a set of nice broad steps, creating a space to sit as well as a way of getting up the slope. Perhaps they could be curved, creating enough space for a table and chairs at the bottom etc.

  • Singing GardenerSinging Gardener EssexPosts: 1,197

    We had a similar situation, although I don't think ours was as high as yours (ours was about 2 metres). We paid a groundwork firm to terrace bits of it and push it back with a high retaining wall elsewhere. And yes, it was extremely expensive! Photos below:

    Before:

    image

    image

    After:

    image

    image

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 79,512

    In a previous life I had a similar situation ... He who thought he should be obeyed got a friend with a digger in and pulled the bank back ............. causing a huge drainage problem as the water table in the bank was higher than the new ground level ................. take professional advice!!! image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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