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Whom do you consider yourself a 'gardener' or a 'horticulturist' ?

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 18,150

    Thomas Edward Brown. 1830–1897  

    "My Garden"

    A Garden is a lovesome thing, God wot!   

    Rose plot,   

    Fringed pool, Fern'd grot—   

    The veriest school         

    Of peace; and yet the fool Contends that God is not— 

    Not God! in gardens! when the eve is cool?   

    Nay, but I have a sign;  

    'Tis very sure God walks in mine.

    THERE IS A LOT OF FERN'D GROT IN MINE.

    imageimage

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,658

    Can I ask why you keep asking the same question - more or less? Is this for an official report?  image

    A horticulturist is an entirely different thing from a gardener in my opinion. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 18,150

    image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,658

    pansy image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Yes, it's an official report that can to fully understand the culture. It is absolutely different from Russian people, for exampleimage Your answers help me to notice some particular features in your attitude to the garden

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 6,634

    I'm a gardener even though I spend more time in my garden that I do at work - which is how I like it :)

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,160

    I like plants and wildlife. I'm not much of a gardener, just enough to be able to propagate more plants 

  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 3,394

    I'm a gardener. I like growing plants and caring for plants  and arranging them together in my garden, making it look  beautiful. I like wildflowers and wildlife too and try to give everything a chance to thrive in my little bit of countryside.

    Horticulturalists grow plants. Some of them, the 'good' ones, like them and care about them, others just like the money. They are the ones who sell plants that are not hardened off to unsuspecting new gardeners before the last frosts, and who sell annuals, which are nearing the end of their life, without clear labels etc.

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 18,150
    fakel19961 says:

    Yes, it's an official report that can to fully understand the culture. It is absolutely different from Russian people, for exampleimage Your answers help me to notice some particular features in your attitude to the garden

    See original post

     WHEN YOU FULLY UNDERSTAND THE CULTURE, I'D LIKE TO SEE YOUR CONCLUSIONS.

    I'VE BEEN TRYING TO UNDERSTAND IT FOR SEVEN DECADES.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 24,929

    Culture is a very loose term to ascribe to gardening.  Some British people absolutely loathe gardening and do nothing at all to maintain their plots.  Others like it tidy but that is limited to cutting the grass and straightening edges.

    Gardeners are people who like pottering with plants and who care about what they grow and try to make it beautiful whether it's a tub, window box, tiny courtyard, suburban plot of country garden.   Britain is an island so what we can grow is widely affected by different weather patterns from north to south and east to west as well as different soils and rainfall levels - far more so than I suspect is the case in Russia.   Gardeners can be amateurs looking after their own garden or professionals looking after other people's garden or public parks.

    Horticulturalists make a living from plants be it research into how to grow and propagate them, developing new varieties, testing new products for pest and disease control, growing in bulk for the mass market or specialising in certain kinds of plants for a nursery, saving seeds and plants in collections to ensure biodiversity is maintained.  They can also be plant hunters, seeking out new plants and introducing them to cultivation and, often as not, saving native populations from encroaching development.  

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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