Which edging shears for border log roll?

Hi everyone,

I've got a flowerbed that has some border log roll edging and it is really difficult to stop the grass getting very long at the edges. I've tried using a strimmer but it doesn't give a very neat finish. Is there a particular type of edging shear that is best for this situation? I thought the horizontal cutting shears, similar to the ones in the following link, might be best but do they work when used directly next to solid edging, or would the edging be in the way?

http://cdnll.gardenersedge.com/images/500/P74_6.jpg

I also have flowerbeds with no edging so are there any particularly good shears to get hold of for that situation? Would those be better to be vertical blades? If it helps all of the flowerbeds have curves rather than straight lines.

Thanks for any help,

Lucid image

Last edited: 27 April 2017 23:16:51

Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,902

    I can't open your link, but you need the long handled kind for doing the edges. Like a pair of scissors. You can also get the same thing but with horizontal blades for doing the surface of the edges. I just use toe first kind though.

    I see that log edging everywhere - but it's not very good for a grass edge. It usually collapses, and people clearly have the same issue because there's always loads of weeds and random bits of grass sticking up!  It's worthwhile investing in a decent edge so that you can mow right up and over the edges, or not bothering with anything at all. Create a little 'ditch' between the grass edge and the border, making a slight slope upwards.  Easier to get the edges clipped really neatly then  image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 23,631

    This is the very reason why I think nobody should ever buy "log roll" to edge a lawn.

    Devon.
  • LucidLucid Posts: 328

    Thanks for the replies. Yes I learnt my lesson after installing it in the front garden beds. That's why the back garden beds have no edging at all. It was also very hard work to get it all in too. I figured if I can get it tidied up then as long as I keep on top of it it'll hopefully look fairly neat, but you're right that grass does grow through it. If this doesn't seem to work then I will probably remove it from the bed that is next to grass and have no edging.

    Sorry that the link didn't work earlier. EDIT - Links still not working, can someone remind me how to get them working on this forum please?

    If I've read your post correctly Fairygirl I think you're saying the vertical type blades would be better than the horizontal blades.

    Thanks again,

    Lucid image

    Last edited: 28 April 2017 08:51:32

  • WillDBWillDB Posts: 1,981

    I've got that log roll stuff (put in by the last owner). It's annoying. I go round it with scissors! As soon as I can, I'm replacing it with something flush that I can get the mower's wheels onto, maybe sleepers if I can afford it. I want something that plants can spill onto a little bit without having them flop on the lawn. But I don't want them 'hemmed in' by the log roll.

    Last edited: 28 April 2017 09:46:45

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 23,631

    Lucid, I think there's a time limit, maybe 5 minutes on Edit, but my undertanding is that it certainly can't be done AFTER someone else has posted on the same thread. 

    I might well be wrong though, as is often the case. image

    Devon.
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 2,380

    I think you need the vertical ones: http://www.gardenersedge.com/bahco-vertical-cutting-action-lawn-edging-shears/p/P75/

    I have no "log roll" or other stuff on my lawn edges, and I use the Spear and Jackson Razorsharp Steel Edging Shears which I find do the job very well.

    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 2,380
    Lucid says:
    Sorry that the link didn't work earlier. EDIT - Links still not working, can someone remind me how to get them working on this forum please?Lucid image

    Last edited: 28 April 2017 08:51:32

    See original post

     http://cdnll.gardenersedge.com/images/500/P74_6.jpg 

    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • LucidLucid Posts: 328

    Thanks for the further replies everyone. Hostafan1 thanks for the tip. I did manage to edit in time to remove the links that were still not showing as links - but it's useful to know that there's a time limit. Thanks for putting in the links Papi Jo - and also the recommendation of tool type.

    I actually ended up wrecking the log roll when I was deweeding this morning. Had some enourmous dandelion roots and my attempts to dig down actually uprooted part of the log roll. So I decided to remove all of it as it seemed more trouble than it was worth. Thanks for the recommendations on which types of tools would be best as this will now help for my grass edged border. Hopefully I'll keep it under better control!

    Lucid image

    Last edited: 28 April 2017 12:00:06

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,902

    You've probably done the right thing Lucid - sorry I couldn't reply earlier as I was dashing out to work!

    I have some three inch (75mm) posts that I use for edging on a border at the front of the house - they were a temporary thing, but I may fix them in properly as they're just the right height for edging there, and it makes it easier to keep the mower level. That might be an option for you, depending on the shapes you need. Alternativley - you can cut them to the height you want and concrete them in vertically. Bit cheaper than sleepers too. Bricks or pavers concreted in make good edges, but again, the price can make that a bit expensive.  image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 2,380

    One word of warning against "hard" lawn edging. I have re-vamped my garden & lawn several times. Originally I wanted to lay brick edging. But bricks are rare in my part of France (Brittany) so I forgot the idea. A few years and mixed borders re-vamping later I am glad I did not lay any hard edges. Saved me the job of removing and re-laying bricks, posts, etc.image

    Of course this means some work keeping the "frontier" between the lawn and the mixed borders neat. But I enjoy it! See my garden "history" at http://www.rezeau.org/wp-garden/en/the-garden-history/

    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
Sign In or Register to comment.