Forum home Plants

Plant suggestions for tricky situation

Hi all I am looking for a plant suggestions...

I am planting a new hedge (laurel etna) up against a 6ft fence which is getting a bit dilapidated & will be replaced by the hedge. It's in a very windy site & sandy soil so even with concrete posts it comes loose over time & starts to wobble. In the mean time, in order to help the fence withstand the wind & stay erect while the hedge grows we are going to periodically (every couple of metres along a 10ft fence) remove a couple of feather edge boards to make approx 10" gaps - to allow the wind through. I feel sure this will work as is other areas of the garden where the fence sections are shorter, it remains erect without issue.

However that will leave 10" x6ft floor to top gaps all the way along & i am keen to try to regain privacy. I cant plant anything in the ground as i need the space for the hedge plants to get properly established roots & in any case if i want to screen the gaps I will need a tall pot in order to make it screen high enough up. So i was thinking to get tall narrow pots (approx 1ft wide & 2-3ft deep) & plant something as tall as possible.

I was wondering about a grass or a bamboo or a climber. But it would need to be...

a) hardy in a usual uk winter

b) evergreen

c) happy for at least 3yrs in the pot size described

d) either 2-3ft tall itself, or if a climber (- which would be fine as i could put trellis in the fence gaps) then be established around canes or something & already grown 2-ft high.

So it would need to be something with roots that tend to grown down rather than out, i wondered about maybe a grass or an evergreen clematis. I wondered about ivy too but i've never seen an ivy to buy that wasnt quite small - you dont tend to see them already grown around canes or similar like you do with say honeysuckle or clematis.

Any ideas or thoughts very gratefully received

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,611

    I would just buy a roll of windbreak fabric and cut it cover the gaps while the hedge grows.  It won't need cossetting or worry about root space and will work perfectly well while you hedge grows up.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • thanks Obelixx

    but i dont want it to be a wind break, i want the wind to be able to get through, thats why the gaps are being put there - ie narrow (10" wide portions of fence are being removed at 2mtr intervals along the fence to allow the wind through - because without them the long fence acts like a sail, - it is such a long, high, sturdy fence that the very strong winds just slam into it (it's a very exposed site). So the gaps are being made so that the wind can get through & therefore not blow it down. It sounds weird but it does work, its similar to 'ventilation' fencing.

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,349

    I'd  agree with Obelixx. In fact - that's what I have on some of my fence where it has only single timbers. It allows the wind to filter through (it wouldn't work as landscape fabric if it wasn't porous) while allowing new planting to have some protection. The rest of my boundary fence ( which I installed) is all double sided - otherwise it would spend most of the winter sitting in my garden, or being repaired, like the ones belonging to the neighbours.

    Standard practice to put this sort of filter in up here in exposed sites until hedging or shrubs establishes.

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 4,037

    And if the wind is that bad, tall skinny planters with tall skinny plants will get blown over all the time.

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • thats really interesting Fairygirl, (and Obelixx), on doing a bit of research it looks really good. I think I'm still going to use plants to fill the gap, just for privacy, as i think the looser weave fabric ( which would be necessary to make the gaps work) will be to 'see through', but it's really reassuring to know that if the fence gives up before the new hedge is high enough, there is another option. I wish i'd known about it before I had fence installed 5yrs ago! It looks really good stuff thanks so much to you both for putting me on to it.

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,611

    It isn't see through unless people deliberately peer and will give you more privacy than a clematis ir oa shrub.  Cheaper too and no maintenance while your new hedge grows.

    I used it very effectively in my last garden.   Don't need it in this one but if I wanted privacy while something grew, that's what I'd use.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Obelixx says:

    It isn't see through unless people deliberately peer and will give you more privacy than a clematis ir oa shrub.  Cheaper too and no maintenance while your new hedge grows.

    I used it very effectively in my last garden.   Don't need it in this one but if I wanted privacy while something grew, that's what I'd use.

    See original post

     Thanks Obelixx, if you have time could i trouble you to post a link of the one you have please? It's just there are so many different sorts that come up when you google it that it's difficult to know which sort to choose. Would you mind showing me the one you have please? so i can get a better idea as the photos i see online look quite transparent to me. It really does sound like the best option as you say

Sign In or Register to comment.