Forum home Plants

Another ID please

ERICS MUMERICS MUM Posts: 627

Found this yesterday when hacking back Salvia Hot Lips !

I think I bought it as a cutting from a plant stall at a street party we had for William & Kate's wedding but I've never seen it in flower.

Is it a Jasmine of some sort ?

thanks as always.

image

Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 34,856

    jsaminum nudiflorum. Winter flowering jasmine. yellow flowers

    Devon.
  • raisingirlraisingirl Posts: 7,079

    It could be winter flowering jasmine (bright yellow flowers). They take ages to establish and flower sometimes, which may be why it hasn't yet. Nice plant for shade, if that's what it is, but if it's in the same spot as hotlips, one of them may be in the wrong location image

    Gardening on the edge of Exmoor, in Devon

    “It's still magic even if you know how it's done.” 
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 34,856

    SNAP

    Devon.
  • soulboysoulboy Posts: 429

    I agree with the ID and it looks very healthy. I have a very well-established one that I've trailed over an arch. I love them and although they are not particularly fast-growing, I think they establish themselves quite quickly and they produce flowers even when still very small.

    I recently discovered a small plant that had established itself from a discarded cutting and it had lots of flowers. If it's not in a convenient place you can dig it up and move it to where you want it.

  • ERICS MUMERICS MUM Posts: 627

    Thanks everyone.  I will move it once I've cleared a more shady spot.  It's not very big - what you see in the pic is more or less it !  I'm going to take a couple of cuttings to experiment.  It was a 50 pence cutting in a paper cup when I bought it so it must be possible.

  • soulboysoulboy Posts: 429

    If you haven't done it already, I wouldn't take any cuttings from this just yet. I would let it grow some more.Then, I would take 4-6" cuttings of fresh (green) growth. They take very easily and root quickly. Also, you can layer them as they will naturally take root when they have contact with the ground and is one way they spread, as they have an arching aspect. You could do that now with that little plant.

    Also, you've probably looked it up already, winter jasmine doesn't require shade and won't thrive in very shaded areas. However, it will grow in any aspect and tolerates a little shade. Mine is east-facing and loves the morning and early afternoon sun.

    Last edited: 18 April 2017 19:30:45

  • Andy LeedsAndy Leeds Posts: 518

    Mine was in a shady area, did really badly for a year and I've now moved it to where it gets lots more sun.  It's looking better now than it did when I originally put it in the ground.

  • soulboysoulboy Posts: 429
    Andy Leeds says:

    Mine was in a shady area, did really badly for a year and I've now moved it to where it gets lots more sun.  It's looking better now than it did when I originally put it in the ground.

    See original post

     image

  • ERICS MUMERICS MUM Posts: 627

    Thanks again.  I don't really have much shade in my garden which is in East Anglia and faces south, so I'm glad to hear it will thrive in light conditions - I'll leave it alone for the mo,  pin a couple of stems down to see if they'll take as runners.

  • soulboysoulboy Posts: 429
    ERICS MUM says:

    Thanks again.  I don't really have much shade in my garden which is in East Anglia and faces south, so I'm glad to hear it will thrive in light conditions - I'll leave it alone for the mo,  pin a couple of stems down to see if they'll take as runners.

    See original post

     I'm sure it will do really well in your garden Erics Mum. In 2-3 years time you will have a substantial plant as they grow reasonably quickly. Depending on the spot it's in you can either leave it to ramble or build/put a support there, such as an arch, that you can train it up. Or if it's near a fence you can do the same there.

    They look great when cultivated in this way.

Sign In or Register to comment.