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Watering / Plant Food

As I have read there is different levels of water for different plants such as  well watered i.e coriander and Basil to water  every now and then such as thyme and oregano to water only when dry such as  Rosemary and Dill.

My question is  how much volume of water do use and do you use any plant food as the season goes on , I read some contradictions on the subject some say no fertilizer where as other say use fertilizer for oregano , what are your thoughts

on a different note but connected , I assume Chillis need to be well watered and fertilized mid way though the season ?

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Posts

  • NoviceHerbsNoviceHerbs Posts: 126

    Thanks alot Pansyface and I hope you dont mind answering all my questions

    Do you think late April / early May is a good time to start planting all my herbs ?

  • raisingirlraisingirl Posts: 7,080

    Yes now is a good time to start. A few very tender ones, like basil, it's still early - it won't cope with the cold nights outside so leave that until June if you're buying plants rather than starting seeds.

    Apart from Pansyface's advice on checking your soil and pot's water retaining ability, the other guide is the plant itself. In most cases you should let the soil dry out before you water again. If you do that with basil you'll see the leaves start to droop. The hard leafed herbs like thyme and rosemary really don't like being wet, soft leafed herbs like basil and mint really don't like being dry. There are no universal rules - you're going to have to go with trial and unhappy error I'm afraid. But you'll figure it out if you pay attention to how each plant responds and then adjust accordingly.

    Chillis (and any other plant that you want to flower and 'fruit') need to be fed once a fortnight (or so) from when they start to flower until they stop fruiting. If you over feed leaf herbs you will encourage them to flower, so every month (for fast growers - annuals) or two (for slow growing perennials) will be fine and only during the warmer months. Don't feed them in the winter and be very sparing with water in winter too - only if they are bone dry. Freezing water round their roots they won't like at all.

    Gardening on the edge of Exmoor, in Devon

    “It's still magic even if you know how it's done.” 
  • NoviceHerbsNoviceHerbs Posts: 126

    Thanks Raisin Girl , I am keeping the Chillis in my conservatory in the evening , shall I do this with the Basil and coriander until June ?

  • raisingirlraisingirl Posts: 7,080
    NoviceHerbs says:

    Thanks Raisin Girl , I am keeping the Chillis in my conservatory in the evening , shall I do this with the Basil and coriander until June ?

    See original post

    yes for basil. I think coriander (assuming it's 'cilantro' for leaf not for seeds) might find it too warm so you may need to put it outside next month and only bring it in if frost is forecast. As I said on the other thread though, I've not had much success with coriander. It bolts very quickly. I had lots of home grown coriander seeds (very nice) but not much salad leaf

    Gardening on the edge of Exmoor, in Devon

    “It's still magic even if you know how it's done.” 
  • NoviceHerbsNoviceHerbs Posts: 126

    raisin girl your probably right i guess my chances are minimal but I use alot in curries.

    Basil seems to have sold out completely in plant form , from every shop , lets hope they get more stock soon

  • raisingirlraisingirl Posts: 7,080

    You can buy basil as 'growing herbs' in most supermarkets. Get 'British grown' if you can, When you get them home, water them, get them out of the pot - you'll find there are dozens of little weedy basil plants crammed in, so repot small clumps with good multi-purpose compost in bigger pots and Bob's your mother's brother image

    I think with coriander you need a really big pot and more diligence than I can muster. You may well do fine image

    Gardening on the edge of Exmoor, in Devon

    “It's still magic even if you know how it's done.” 
  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 4,537

    My supermarket has loads of Basil, coriander and parsley!

    Buy a pot of each,then, when you get them home, split each potful into 4 and plant in separate pots. There are far too many seedlings in each pot for healthy plant growth other wise They will need hardening off before going outside and as said above, basil likes to be warm!.

  • NoviceHerbsNoviceHerbs Posts: 126

    What sort of diligence do you need for coriander ?

  • raisingirlraisingirl Posts: 7,080

    The right frequency of watering. Don't ask me what that is - never got it right image

    Gardening on the edge of Exmoor, in Devon

    “It's still magic even if you know how it's done.” 
  • NoviceHerbsNoviceHerbs Posts: 126

    Its trial and error I guess

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