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Honey fungus

Hi, I had a maple / sycamore tree removed because I was advised that it had honey fungus.  I have lived here since August 2016 and never saw anything resembling honey fungus on the tree or nearby lawn. I did see tiny white, almost translucent, mushrooms on the bark but nothing else.  I intended to have the tree pollarded but was advised to remove it because there were signs of honey fungus near the root.  I have now had the stump ground out and understand that I am very limited to what I can plant in it's place (forget the magnolia I just bought!). Is there anyway of checking if honey fungus is present in the soil where the tree was?

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  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336

    This factsheet contains lists of susceptible, resistant and immune plants, trees and shrubs:

    https://www.gov.gg/CHttpHandler.ashx?id=4797&p=0

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • Jazz883Jazz883 Posts: 10

    Thank you Bob, I will check out what I c an plant in it's place - will there be anything to see that may indicate that Honey Fungus is still present / active In that area?

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,394

    After a stump grinding there won't be much left to see if there was anything  to see in the first place. 

    You might find the black 'bootlaces', I think rhizomorphs might be the correct word. These are fungal growths by which the fungus moves from one plant to another. 

  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336

    If it was present, I'd expect to see black bootlace-like strands in the soil (rhizomorphs) and in between the bark and heartwood of the stump.  If you didn't see anything like that, there's a fair chance it was a mis-diagnosis.  Have you lost any other woody plants and shrubs in the general area?

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336

    Snap, nut! image

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • We have a horticultural advisory service here, where you can take suspect bark/twig/soil samples to be analyzed for honey fungus and other plant diseases.  Perhaps you have something similar in your area Jazz.  Your local gardening club or park keeper may be able to help put you in contact with such a service?

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,394

    image Bob

    Jazz, it could have been a mis-diagnosis. Some people are ready to label any fungi HF, including some who should know better. But I wouldn't put anything expensive there for a year or two til you see what's happening

  • Jazz883Jazz883 Posts: 10

    Thank you all so much - I did have a good look into the soil and bark chippings (which were very fine) but could not see anything out of the ordinary, although to be honest, was not entirely sure what I was looking for But certainly no bootlace like things.  I have a choisya, holly and eleagnus nearby which are all healthy as are the camellia and hydrangea a bit further away.  So, I will check to see if we have a horticultural advisory service in our area And hope that it is a mis-diagnosis.

    Once again, thank you all so much for your help and advice.

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