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Lavender

Apologies if the picture comes through at the wrong angle.

I believe that sadly our lavender bushes have not survived the winter.

To us they look dead can any experts confirm they're dead before we toss them out?

Anu suggestions what to replace them with? - needs to be fairly hardy. We're in the north of Scotland but in a sheltered valley. 

Thanks

image

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Posts

  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,489

    Looks dead to me.  I stick to the Hidcote variety (not as a standard) in SW Scotland .

    I put plenty of grit in with the compost, if it's in a pot.

    SW Scotland
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,520

    That doesn't look too lively Highlandness  image

    I don't think lavender suits our climate up here at all to be honest. I'm further south and in the west so it's the cold wet soil that does for them, no matter how hard you try to give them the right conditions. 

    Are you looking for something structural for your pot? Something similar? 

    You could try Hebes. The smaller leaved varieties. They like sun and well drained soil, but they cope with a fair bit of winter conditions. If you get a long spell of hard weather you can bring them into a sheltered position - by the house wall or similar. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Lily PillyLily Pilly Central southern Scotland Posts: 3,845

    Highlandness,

    I fight a battle with my lavender every year but they are an integral part of my design every year I replace the dead ones with nepeta (cat mint)  which I shape, eventually they will all be away. We lose several every winter but I never pull the out until the end of June. Sometimes a little shoot comes from the base

    Weeds are flowers, too, once you get to know them.”
    A A Milne
  • Thank you for confirming - I had feared the worst.

    We're looking for something very similar. We haven't got windows downstairs only French Windows so it was nice having the "trees" either side.

    All of them look like that though and that's after having drainage and grit/gravel in the bottom of the planters.

    It was also lovely having the smell of the lavender wafting over the garden last year.

    I like hebes but I'm wary of them. We bought two supposedly dwarf types and they're residing in our back border as a very big shrub and that's despite pruning  (I know you're not supposed to prune them but we had to when we moved house) They're lovely shrubs and I really like them but I'm weary that the dwarf variety were slightly bigger than planned. image

  • Lily PillyLily Pilly Central southern Scotland Posts: 3,845

    Have you thought about container roses? Many are hardy for our climate and lots are highly fragranced

    Weeds are flowers, too, once you get to know them.”
    A A Milne
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 35,520

    I have three Hebe Vernicosa in pots -  they don't get out of hand if you have them contained, and you can trim and tidy after flowering. image

    There's also one called Buxifolia - as the name suggests, the foliage is like Box. Vernicosa is very similar. 

    These have been in the pots for three years now, and it's something I've done before. They make good pot specimens. 

    image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Fairygirl says:

    I have three Hebe Vernicosa in pots -  they don't get out of hand if you have them contained, and you can trim and tidy after flowering. image

    There's also one called Buxifolia - as the name suggests, the foliage is like Box. Vernicosa is very similar. 

    These have been in the pots for three years now, and it's something I've done before. They make good pot specimens. 

    imageSee original post

     Your pots look lovely. That might a be solution.

    Lily Pilly I've only had a little experience with roses are container roses hard work in that do you have to continually spray them and dehead and prune them?

  • Highland I have a friend in the Black Isle, where they get some viciously cold weather - she has lavenders growing along a sheltered, south facing wall in her garden (potted) and protects them every year with loads of horticultural fleece - they survive every time. 

    She also mulches them before the winter additionally (being careful not to mulch too close to the stem) and raises her pots up onto pot stands, so they're not in contact with the cold floor.

    Maybe you could try this? Or maybe you already have!

    Last edited: 29 March 2017 10:56:46

  • Fairygirl your pots are like something out of a gardening magazine - they're immaculate and beautiful! 

    [potted plant envy image]

  • jessisinthegarden says:

    Highland I have a friend in the Black Isle, where they get some viciously cold weather - she has lavenders growing along a sheltered, south facing wall in her garden (potted) and protects them every year with loads of horticultural fleece - they survive every time. 

    She also mulches them before the winter additionally (being careful not to mulch too close to the stem) and raises her pots up onto pot stands, so they're not in contact with the cold floor.

    Maybe you could try this? Or maybe you already have!

    Last edited: 29 March 2017 10:56:46

    See original post

     I think we'd done most of that bar the fleece. There's 5 of them and the ones at the back were tucked in against a South facing wall on decking rather than concrete. 

    It's too late now anyway as they're dead and I don't want to risk it again. 

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