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Agastache & Platycodon seedlings

Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559

I saved seed from the above last year and pricked out the seedlings on sunday. I've now got 48 Agastache and 24 Platycodon seedlings in 6 seed trays.

They're taking up a lot of space on my heated mat so I was wondering, as they are hardy perennials would they be ok left on the staging in my unheated greenhouse as I'll soon need the space on the heated mat for petunias etc?

Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

Posts

  • Mark56Mark56 Windsor, BerkshirePosts: 1,653

    Agastache are very tender so I'd say no, they are a mexican plant. Not sure about the other. 

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,397

    I don't know which agastache you've got, the ones I grow are hardy but they're not all hardy.

    Platycodon is a hardy perennial. 

    Hard to say how any will cope with sudden change of circumstances, but they should be OK. Without the history of heat they would be fine

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,150

    I've pricked out some agastache this afternoon, it's the first time I've grown them.

    I take all my seedlings out of the heated propagator once they've germinated and put them onto my seedlings shelf in the conservatory, they get lots of light and it's frost free.  The agastache has been growing nicely without the need for extra heat, the same goes for my half hardy annuals. 

    I use plastic lids on the trays for protection on chilly nights.

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,397

    I germinate both of these with no heat, very quickly. I never use heat on anything now.

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,150

    Ah, but it's a bit chillier for us further north nut image. I need all the help I can get image

    My new toy, the heated prop, has meant I've not had to sit looking at bare trays for weeks. It's been useful as a little kick start for mine, once they're up, they're out on the shelf to toughen up.

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559

    Thanks for all your advice as always.
    They're ok for the next week or so on the mat, they'll then have to take their chances on the shelf above in the hope that a little residual heat gets to them. If we get a cold snap I could move them into my little lean-to that I can keep at +5C
    Just have to hope the weather is kind..

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,397

    up north, a different world image

    I know, if we visit BIL in spring, (Solway Coast) it's always 3 weeks ahead when we get home

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559

    So I've heard - and you're fortunate enough to get rain more than a few times a year :) we're forever battling drought down south

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Mark56Mark56 Windsor, BerkshirePosts: 1,653

    Mine are on my sunny windowsill too, looking forward to them this year. Pete, I thought you were in the Scotland for some reason, I do apologise. Just keep an eye on severe frosts. 

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,559

    Cheers Mark  - we're usually fortunate in Essex with our weather, but lack of rain is troublesome. I spread 4 ton of rotted horse manure last autumn - it'd better help!

    And quite why I feel the need for 48 agastache's.....

    Last edited: 28 March 2017 18:45:05

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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