Wildlife Pond and filters

Hi.  Last autumn we created a new pond to attract wildlife out of the remains of a koi carp pond which we inherited when moving to a new home.    The old pond had vertical sides and a two foot wall all round it and was not wildlife friendly, so the koi have been rehomed and the new pond is hopefully wildlife friendly with sloping sides to allow frogs etc to exit.

The plants we put in seems to be doing ok and are coming back to life now.  There's a small waterfall with a pump with a filter and the water passes over a uv light (which was part of the koi pond set up).  We left this in to stop the water going green, the pond is unfortunately in a sunny position.

But there doesn't appear to much sign of life apart from a few tiny snails and one beetle so far.   Is the uv light the problem or are we just being impatient?  Can anyone help please?

Also can anyone advise what plants to put in for surface cover? We've put in a water lily but I know we need more surface cover.   Any advice would be gratefully received.

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Last edited: 28 March 2017 09:43:08

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,150

    WELL, YOU HAVE MADE A NICE LITTLE POND THERE WITH PLENTY OF PLACES FOR WILDLIFE TO LURK AND WAYS TO GET OUT OF THE WATER. GREAT.

    BUT HOW MANY NATURAL PONDS IN THE COUNTRYSIDE COME WITH FILTERS AND UV LIGHTS?

    THERE ARE FISH PONDS AND WILDLIFE (NATURAL) PONDS.  IF YOU REALLY WANT TO ATTRACT WILDLIFE I THINK YOU ARE GOING TO HAVE TO ACCEPT GREEN WATER (IT WILL SOON SORT ITSELF OUT INTO NORMAL LOOKING WATER) AND ALL THE OTHER POSSIBLY NOT SO ATTRACTIVE ASPECTS OF NATURE. LIKE MUD AND LEAVES AND STUFF.

    TURN OFF THE PUMP, THE FILTER AND THE UV. AND THEN WAIT FOR SEVERAL MONTHS.

    ONCE YOU DO THAT, PLANTS WILL INVADE BY THEMSELVES AND WITHOUT ANY HELP FROM YOU.

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    Last edited: 28 March 2017 13:55:21

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,994

    Looks lovely and if your pond has good depth, being in full sun should not be a problem.

    Green water happens as algae multiply on the abundant nutrients that are available in the water, so to get rid of the green water, introduce plants as you have done which will compete with the algae for the nutes. At first the algae will win out as they're simple plants and just multiply like crazy, but as your plants become established they will out-compete the algae and the algae dies of starvation. This time of year the pond plants aren't yet really underway so the algae is taking advantage of this situation and making he most of the nutrients that have built-up over winter, the plants will reverse that once they start growing.
    As you probably know it's all a matter of balance. I have a fish pond a large tropical aquarium, and sometimes I get algae blooms of various varieties in both - i'm afraid that's life but the algae isn't a problem in a wildlife pond, it just doesn't look very nice. Keep your plants happy and they'll sort the green water out.

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Chris789Chris789 Posts: 52

    image

    I have a pump and filter in my pond, it's mainly used to power the waterfall. I also have lots of wildlife, frogs (lots of spawn this year) newts, beetles, snails, pond skaters all kinds of different creatures. Bats and birds too. So I don't think filters/pumps stop wildlife using a pond, I guess they'll look at a number of things, I mean I don't have fish, have plenty of plants, I have deep and sallow areas. Must say I don't always have the pump on and I do get some algae at times too. On surface cover I use frog bit which disappears in winter see pic above. I also find forget me nots (pic below) and Brooklime seem to float across a little from the margins

    image

    You're pond looks brilliant btw, I really like the shallow beach area, very nice!

  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 1,737

    I have a pond with a filter and UV lights and loads of wildlife including frogs, toads and newts. Yours may need more plants to encourage things but I do wonder if they are already there and you just haven't seen them. Get a really good torch and go out on a dark night and have a good look. You may see more than you expect. Otherwise, give it a few more weeks.

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,962

    What do people really mean when they say wildlife pond? What sort of wildlife? I have a pond, it's got fish in it . It also has plants and lots of beasties, mud and muck. Also a pump and a uv filter. Is it a fish pond or a plant pond or a wildlife pond or just a mucky pond? 

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • PosyPosy Isle of Wight.Posts: 1,737

    I'm not sure, Hogweed. I just call mine a pond. We put in a few goldfish, many years ago and now we have dozens, but we also see a fascinating collection of other residents and visitors like dragonflies. A heron turns up regularly, too, so we had to net it but a pair of ducks visited the other day and pottered about under the net for an hour or two. It's fantastic for pond dipping with young children and a source of interest any time I pause for a moment to look into its modest depth.

  • a1154a1154 Posts: 749

    I think its an interesting question hogweed. I researched before creating my wildlife pond and went with - dont add anything at all, dont manage it, and absolutely dont move anything from another pond.

    People say they want a wildlife pond, but they want an ornamental pond in their gardens, and water is great for wildlife! but you cant get upset if a kills b or if there is a algae bloom. All perfectly natural. 

    Im planning a fish pond also, so i see that as a managed environment (a better not kill b or a will be in trouble!)

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 27,872

    We had a mahoosive pond at our last house, with a second, smaller one it fed into. It had everything in it - koi, golden orfe, even a trout, plus every other sort of insect and creature. It was deep enough to swim in (my daughter did! ) but was fed by a spring so it had a natural 'waterfall'. If it's big enough, you can have it all. 

    I now have a teeny tiny pond, but it has lots of little creatures. I wouldn't add fish because there isn't enough room for everything to thrive, and I'd rather have frogs one day. Each year since I made it, I've brought frogspawn home from the hills, and some has survived and made it to froglet stage and beyond. Had a little frog in the garden last summer. Hopefully I'll get some of those little ones spawning in a year or two.

    image

    A  reasonable size of pond - such as  Ann has - will be able to sustain most life that uses it without too much bother. None of my ponds have had pumps, but in a space that size, there will be plenty  of calm water for frogs if you have them. 

    Looks good Ann - you're well on the way to having a great little habitat there.  image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 23,624

    I'm just too tight to waste money on filters and UV whatsits and stuff and the electricity needed to run them.

    Two options in my pond, and indeed in the lake. " do , or die" Plenty of stuff in, and on,  both

    Devon.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,150

    MY DEFINITION OF "WILDLIFE POND" BEGINS WITH THE WORD "WILD". 

    THERE ARE PONDS WHICH CONTAIN FISH BUT I WOULDN'T CALL THEM WILD FISH UNLESS THEY ARE COMPLETELY SELF SUFFICIENT. IF THEY ARE FED AND CLEANED AND MEDICATED THEN, FOR ME, THEY AREN'T WILDLIFE. THEY ARE DOMESTIC ANIMALS.

    MOST GARDEN PONDS WHICH CONTAIN FISH ARE NOT, IN MY OPINION, WILDLIFE PONDS.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
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