Crazy idea?

I'm preparing my garden to sow a lawn in September. I have quite a few small trees, bushes and shrubs to remove to give me a blank canvas to lawn nearly all the garden. There is an old shed at the bottom of the garden that is where a patio area will be and I'll begin to build next year. The only area of the garden that won't be prepped for lawn is the shed. My question is.... 

Is it possible to use the shed as a compost bin for all the foliage I cut down?  I'll be shredding it all. 

Thanks

«13

Posts

  • CloggieCloggie Posts: 1,177

    Sounds drastic.  Assuming you won't ever want to use the shed again, it could work but where would you put the compost that you make, you won't have anywhere to spread it on, it'll be all lawn won't it?  In my experience the compost won't be ready by September if it's a lot of shredded woody stuff.

  • Oh ok. I'd read on BBC that it can take only a few months to produce. Fibbers Haha. 

    It just seemed convenient to me. Get rid of the garden waste and nice compost to dig in to the soil ready to sow the lawn

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 13,914

    I have a turn over of two months on compost, but not inside a shed, it needs rain, ours is on bare earth for worms bacteria etc to get to it,  a mixture of greens and browns, hot sun on it. covered tightly, turned over every couple of weeks, I can't see it working. You could try if you really want to, the worse that will happen is that you bag it up and take it to the tip if it's not ready.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 1,888

    Compost can be made quickly but it needs ideal conditions and a container that will allow it to heat up. You need a mix of brown (shredded woody waste) and green soft weeds grass clippings etc. It needs contact with soil or some soil mixed in (to supply bacteria). Monty Don is well known for his advice and expertise in making compost, check out back copies of GW magazine or past programmes if you can find them on line, or the rest of GW website.

    AB Still learning

  • Lyn says:

    I have a turn over of two months on compost, but not inside a shed, it needs rain, ours is on bare earth for worms bacteria etc to get to it,  a mixture of greens and browns, hot sun on it. covered tightly, turned over every couple of weeks, I can't see it working. You could try if you really want to, the worse that will happen is that you bag it up and take it to the tip if it's not ready.

    See original post

     Hi Lyn, i had read not to let rain get to it, partly how I got the idea. It said rain would make it too wet. So is that not the way to go? 

    Thanks again to all of you

  • CloggieCloggie Posts: 1,177

    I'm not an expert but I do have experience.  

    Not fibbers because you can get stuff in months in "bestest" conditions.  

    You might use some soil from the garden laced in to the mix as a "starter" (it has bacteria in it, layer a couple of thin layers in between grass mowings and your woody shreddings) and a bit of your household's urine (Google that as a crazy idea - I'm talking human urine!).  

    Hopefully your shed is in a sunny spot because that's good for compost heaps and it needs a soil base so the worms can get to it - compost on concrete is not a goer!  Ideal conditions have air in the mix so you might want to "turn" your heap.  Maybe stack it on one side of the shed and chuck it over to the other side in July to mix in Oxygen.

    I personally believe it is best to try for something rather than nothing so go for it I'd say.  

    One thing to note:  the stuff you put under the lawn will break down over time and it may do this variably so if you are aiming for a level, lovely, bowling green surface, ensure that your compost is way down low in the soil stack not just under the turf.  Google double-digging for more info.

    Hope this is helpful.

  • Garden noobGarden noob Posts: 240

    In my experience items decompose at different rates in a compost bin. So after a few months it'll basically look like compost, but you'll see a few identifiable objects in it, e.g. branches, egg shells, moss, orange rind etc - probably not in the right state to dig in to the ground.

    Also, compost bins take time to get going. They need the right bacteria to get cooking and they benefit from worms too. You can add a commercial accelerator, but urine is meant to be good too - quite easy to add if it's in your shed! I doubt any worms would find their way into your shed. Maybe you could start a compost bin on earth, then transfer its contents including worms etc to your shed.

  • CloggieCloggie Posts: 1,177

    I still think it's a shame that you're "blanding" your garden but it's your choice.

  • Cloggie says:

    I still think it's a shame that you're "blanding" your garden but it's your choice.

    See original post

     Sorry what do you mean blanding? 

  • CloggieCloggie Posts: 1,177

    My apologies if I've misunderstood and I mean no offence but it sounded as if you were turning a garden with trees and shrubs into a field/lawn.

Sign In or Register to comment.