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Plant ID

I have been nurturing these plants, whilst believing them to be Salvia - yet they don't look like any Salvia that I have googled.

Can anyone identify them please?image

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  • B3B3 Posts: 21,500

    Can't remember the name but they have magenta or white flowers, hairy , greyish leaves and seed everywhere - even between paving slabs.

    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Andy LeedsAndy Leeds Posts: 518

    Looks a bit like my stachys Byzantina but not as silvery.  Maybe a different type?

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,542

    Looks like rose campion to me

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,557
    B3 says:

    Can't remember the name but they have magenta or white flowers, hairy , greyish leaves and seed everywhere - even between paving slabs.

    See original post

     Do you mean Centaurea? Could be

    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,378

    B3's plant sounds like Lychnis coronaria which I think might be the same as Pete's rose campion

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,637

    I'm going with Nut, white form of Lychnis coronaria. ( seedling might not be white )

    Devon.
  • Thanks everyone.  I have just googled - says it is perennial, self seeding, approx. 1 metre tall. The colour is a vivid pinky/red.  The big problem is slugs, which hopefully won't find their way to the plants. I assume this is a relative plant to the Maltese Cross, which someone kindly sent me seeds of.  Can I plant both these outside now?

  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,920

    I've never had slugs eat my Lychnis coronaria or lambs ears. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,637

    GD, tough as old boots and they self seed most agreeably. Seedlings are, clearly, easy to spot and remove if they're not where you'd like them, and I find they move easily to somewhere else.

    Devon.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,600

    If it is the white form of lychnis coronaria and you already have the deep carmine pink ones they will cross pollinate and give you pink and white flowered babies or white with pink tinges or blotches.  Bit hairy so not usually slug fodder.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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