Relocating a well established frog colony

Hi all,

Long story short we have an old 1980's fibreglass pond smack in the middle of our garden. It's teeming with frogs (12 adults counted last summer, and hundreds of spawn) and recently active again as they kick into life to breed.

The issue is the area immediately surrounding it is being redesigned, so the shelter the pond was afforded has gone - and I know for a fact they've been preyed upon by something (I suspect a heron from the local canal). Secondarily, I have a 1yr old who by this summer will likely want to have a toddle around and explore the garden. So, the pond has to go.

I'm reluctant to disturb the frogs, and really don't want to harm them in any way. I'd actually consider moving them to another part of the garden temporarily until a more suitable time to rehome them.

Can anyone offer advice on a) re-siting them into a new area without causing harm and b) the best time of year to make a permanent move?

All the best,

Posts

  • There are a few threads on here which mention making ponds "baby proof" - may be worth a look ?It could be that you don't actually have to get rid of your pond.

    You can't really rehome adult frogs as such - if you have a pond which they have been using, they will continue to come into your garden.

    Why not have a word with your local wildlife trust and see if they can advise you ?

  • Bad time to move the pond at present because of spawning.
    Frogs don't spend much time of the year in the pond so if you shift the pond after the tadpoles have become froglets then I think next year you will find all the frogs will be back there and enjoying the change of scenery.

  • FitzchivFitzchiv Posts: 3

    Thanks for the replies folks. I've got a lot on my hands in the garden at present so I can afford to wait, especially if babyproofing as a short-term solution. There's an area behind the shed I could make a permanent home for them, so if they're not that particular I'll just wait until the spawn has developed into froglets and make the move. I guess I could even create the new habitat now and hope they help me along a little!

  • Whaddya mean, we have to move!

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    Last edited: 14 March 2017 11:55:34

  • I'm STILL waiting for the builders to finish.
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  • OnopordumOnopordum Posts: 390

    If you really do have hundreds of spawn clumps, then that indicates 100s of frogs rather than 12 - each adult female lays 1 clump per year. The males tend to be more visible because they hang around the pond longer on the lookout for females. So potentially a lot of frogs are coming to spawn from the wider area, not just your immediate garden. Can you post a photo of the pond?

  • Well, I've learned something today - I hadn't realised each female only laid one clump paimage

  • Yes I agree - I've had various ponds and frogs over the years but oddly enough, this year is the first time I have noticed one clump of spawn looking rather yellowish - certainly different enough to stand out from the other clumps. Not just timing either - dark clump, yellow clump, dark clump, etc.

    Pond life , with or without frogs, is endlessly fascinating.

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