Harlequin Ladybird

I have several hibernating masses of ladybirds, about 90% of them are harlequin ladybirds. Over the last few days in the garden I've also come across several harlequin ladybirds and just 1 native 7 spot ladybird.

A thought occurred that maybe I should be destroying the harlequin ladybird to help our native species. As a bit of a softie I don't think I actually could (would be quilt ridden!!) but wondered what people did with their's?

Posts

  • Singing GardenerSinging Gardener EssexPosts: 746

    I think nearly all of the ladybirds in my garden are harlequin ladybirds and they're so widespread that I could never make much of a dent in the population so I just leave them. They also do a brilliant job of eliminating aphids from the plants!

  • B3B3 Posts: 9,070

    I leave them. I think it's a battle lost.

    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,195

    I agree B3 - they're here - we're not going to be able to exterminate them, and at least they eat aphids.

    If they do kill off the native ladybirds, and we try to kill off the Harlequins, we'll be over-run with aphids.

    I leave them alone to get on with what they're good at. 

    Last edited: 10 March 2017 16:25:06

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • andrew1958andrew1958 Posts: 2

    I have just found these larvae on my blackcurrant bush. Are these harlequin larvae do you think? They're on a particular bush that looks as if it's suffering from aphids . It's the first time I've seen these larvae so I'd appreciate anyone's thoughts / advice!

    image!image

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 25,883

    they'll eat your aphids

    they're here to stay 

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,195

    I agree with Nut :-)

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,195

    We've got plenty of Harlequins here on our roses ... they're certainly keeping the aphids down image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • andrew1958andrew1958 Posts: 2

    Thanks for so many swift replies! The link sent by Chrissie B was very helpful as the larva of H.axyridis shown there looks pretty much identical to the photos that I posted. So - as it IS a Harlequin, the question is whether to spray the blackcurrant bushes and hopefully kill both the aphids and the invasive ladybird larvae all together - or let the ladybirds do my job for me and survive to increase their species ... thoughts??

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 25,883

    Andrew 1958

    The less spray you use, the better for wildlife in general. All ladybirds and the bluetits and co will eat aphids but you'll never achieve a balance if you kill parts of the food chain. and remember that's your food crop you're spraying poison onto

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