Forum home Wildlife gardening

Yorkstone ok in the pond?

Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,869

I'm finally hoping to get round to finishing off my wildlife pond over the next couple of months.
In order to prove somewhere for the wildlife to get in and out I was planning on getting a load of yorkstone and placing it on the shelves within the pond then continue with the yorkstone out of the pond with a little rockery and a gravel beach leading to the edge.
Is yorkstone safe to use in the pond?

Thanks

image

Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
«1

Posts

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 4,053

    Yes it should be safe enough. I have sandstone round my pond and never had a problem.

    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 21,228

    IT MIGHT BE AN IDEA TO PUT A LAYER OF UNDERFELT OR SOME SORT OF MATTING BETWEEN THE FIBREGLASS AND THE STONE. JUST TO LESSEN THE RISK OF ANY KIND OF DAMAGE OCCURRING. 

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,869

    Thanks.
    Good idea pansy - I'll get some underfelt

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • The_herpetologistThe_herpetologist West YorksPosts: 481

    Yes, it should be fine. I have had it round my pond for a few years, makes a great hideaway for frogs and newts.

    image

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,869

    ThanksThh.
    I'll have to temporarily evict the frog that has taken up residence, but hope it returns when it sees what a nice job I've done :)

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Trying coir matting as the edging cover on my new wildlife pond - so little claws can clamber in and out of the water. Also hoping any tannins have leached out by soaking it first. It soaks up water and wicks it into the u-shaped butyl overlap that is the bog garden edge. I have  sprinkled seeds and soil mix into the exposed coir then added rocks and a gravel beach.

    Log pile at one end and a York Stone paver, as a bird bath shelf, at the other. if York stone leaches out anything nasty I would be keen to know too.

    MLx

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,869

    Good idea about the coir - I'll look into it

    Thanks

    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • MarineliliumMarinelilium Posts: 213

    image

    Just a heads up Pete8 about the coir mat to cover pond liner; at least four species of bird made off like bandits with the coir leaving exposed liner. Next door's cat brought this nest down - that a female blackbird worked so hard to make. She is now making another nest and  recycling this one.  I even put spare coir in the shrubs for the nesters but they preferred the pond edging?!?

    I suppose it worked for the wildlife - if not for the pond : /

    MLx

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 82,251

    Yes blackbirds around here like coir matting for their nests ... I've watched one totally decimating a liner in a wrought iron manger-type planting basket on the wall of a building nearby.

     image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • MarineliliumMarinelilium Posts: 213

    Oh mangers would be just perfect for these raiders. Blackbird flies off looking like she's grown a handlebar moustache. Greenfinches, blue tits and long tailed tits are a bit more discreet about the amount they stuff in their beaks but they make lots more visits.

    I will have to use stones to protect liner from UV. Coir seemed like a good idea to help creatures get out of the pond so might use it with gravel on the edges. Live and learn!

    MLx

Sign In or Register to comment.