Tips and advice for burning garden waste

http://imgur.com/a/QnFgR

Hi all!

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After a lot of trimming and tidying I've got an awful lot of garden waste. I am reluctant to try and turn it into a bonfire in case it's too annoying for the neighbours or I hurt some poor creature. 

So I am gradually trying to burn it; however it's just not burning. I get the fire going and then I try to burn some of the more brown, dry inner wood but after a minute the fire is out.

Does anyone have any helpful tips or advice to get rid of this hep easily?

Thanks!

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Posts

  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 27,213

    Is it possible to hire shredders? That would make short work of it and the shreddings could be useful. Those branches are still too green to burn and you need to check that you do not live in a smokeless zone or you could get into all sorts of trouble.

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • Ladybird4 says:

    Is it possible to hire shTdders? That would make short work of it and the shreddings could be useful. Those branches are still too green to burn and you need to check that you do not live in a smokeless zone or you could get into all sorts of trouble.

    See original post

     Thank you. I should have said I live in a semi-rural area with thick vegetation between me and my neighbours and the council allows small fires.

    How long would it take for the branches to become burnable? Should I cover them or put them in the shed and wait a few weeks-months?

  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 27,213

    That sounds like a plan. I think I would opt for the shed option as they need to be kept dry and a tarpaulin would only make the wood 'sweat' and it wouldn't dry.

    I should have added that it may take several months depending on the thickness of the pieces.

    Last edited: 10 December 2016 21:29:03

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • Thank you both :) 

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,120

    Hi Rachael, must admit to being a little confused as to timeline on pic1 & pic2 photos as some burning seems to have already taken place in pic1.

    Sorry Edd, but I would strongly advise against "piling it high" and burning overnight. The position of your incinerator seems too close to the boundary Rachael, and any fires lit in the garden need too be watched until they have died down and put out safely.  

     Edd's advice to pile it high to burn overnight is unsafe and reckless.

    I have a small garden Rachael, and would never attempt to burn that quantity of wet garden waste all in one go.

  • Hi kitty. I've been able to burn a small amount but it goes out very easily and involves a lot of cutting to get just the brownish- dryer bits. 

    I wouldn't feel safe to burn it all in one go and I'd worry about wildlife. 

    I put it near their so the trees would hide most of the smoke but I see your point about it being too close to the boundary  and will move it :) 

    I think I'll divide it up into some for the shed and then a bit more to be kept under tarpaulin for a few weeks or months. 

  • Busy-LizzieBusy-Lizzie Posts: 14,243

    How possible would it be to take it to the tip?

    Dordogne and Norfolk
  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,120

    Following from Busy-Lizzies advice.. Does your local council provide a "green" recycling bin? I would put the small stuff in the bin and try to store the larger pieces of tree branches/trunks in a dry place (not necessarily the shed)  and use them in for a burning in a sociable fire pit in the summer.image

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,120

    Calm down Edd, I just didn't want Rachael to set the street on fire following your advice.

    And yep, we do pay our council tax to enable them to send it up in flamesimage

    We also burn a whole lot of stuff in our tiny urban garden, SAFELY?image image

    Last edited: 10 December 2016 23:09:58

  • A shredder is definitely your best bet at this time of year. Conifer does burn fairly easily, even fresh, provided it is really dry, but that is more easy to achieve in  a drier season.  You need dry kindling to start it and then add a little at a time until the fire is really hot, then you can add larger amounts. Once you have a good bed of embers you can use it to dry some of the damper stuff, but that does make more smoke. I love a good bonfire and have some lovely blazes, but I live in the middle of nowhere, with no neighbours to worry aboutimage

    Hire  a shredder if you can, though it would be worth getting one of your own if you are regularly going to get large amounts

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