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Do plants have a biological clock?

I think that's how it works aym. They tinker with the temperatures and the light levels to fool the plants into thinking it's the right time to flower early, or hold them back.

Someone clever will have a better explanation than me image

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  • Plants certainly have a biological clock - some are triggered into flowering by the length of the day or night.

    They certainly don't have a biological calendar, they only know if it is warm or cold, sunny or dark. If they did have a calendar they would not grow and flower at strange times of year, as the often do.

  • pansyfacepansyface Posts: 21,568

    THIS SHOULD MAKE EVERYTHING CLEAR, I THINK.image

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circadian_rhythm

    AND FOR DESSERT.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrainment_(chronobiology)

    Last edited: 24 November 2016 10:17:04

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
    If you live in Derbyshire, as I do.
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 28,840

    As AC says, plants are driven by either temperatures or day length.   Some seeds won't germinate till they've had a period of chill followed by warmth which indicates winter is over and it's safe to grow.   Some seeds, like lettuces, won't germinate above a certain temperature as they know it will be too hot for the plant.

    You need to know what the plant is, where it grows, what trigger growth and then adjust its environment accordingly.  I can't see the point of messing with natural rhythms unless you're growing for exhibition, competition or shows like Chelsea where things have to be at the right peak of performance.  It requires such an investment in time and materials and heaters and lighting.

    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • punkdocpunkdoc Posts: 13,263

    A lot of plants exhibit photoperiodism, they flower when day is longer than night, or vice versa.

    This can be an issue if plants are grown in one country and then shipped to another. They are geared to flower when the day length is that in their country of origin. This information exists in the seeds of the plant as well.

    Not sure I have explained that very well, but I know what I mean!

    There are ashtrays of emulsion,
    for the fag ends of the aristocracy.

    S.Yorkshire/Derbyshire border
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 28,840

    What's available commercially is more a question of what's easy to propagate using mechanical means and without paying plant breeder's rights where possible so seeds, cuttings, potting on in industrial scales.  They have huge sheds and machines in The Netherlands which is where so much of it is grown.

    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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