Goldcrest (Regulus regulus0

Out in the garden yesterday I heard a high pitched bird call from afar, it was getting closer by the second.  Just then two wee birds zoomed past my head.  They decided to dart in and around my small acer tree.  Obviously looking for insects.   I managed to tip toe back into the house to get my camera.  Luckily it's kept on the shelf by the back door.

I had no idea what I was looking at.  All I knew was that they weren't wrens because of the yellow stripe on their heads.  I'll get an ID later I told myself.  Out of about 20 pictures, sadly one one was 'almost' in focus.

image

They eventually flew off but did come back later and sat on the rowan tree for a short while.  It would be nice if they visited me again.  My eyes are peeled! 

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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,218

    image

    THEY ARE REAL SWEETIES.

    A COUPLE OF YEARS AGO WE CUT DOWN A CUPRESSUS TREE AND FOUND ONE OF THEIR OLD NESTS. MADE OF LICHEN, CAT FUR, SHEEP'S WOOL AND HORSEHAIR, IT MEASURES ABOUT THREE INCHES ACROSS.

    I KEEP IT JUST TO LOOK AT FROM TIME TO TIME.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 28,197

    They like conifers so they're quite common up here in the 'land of conifer'  image

    I have one which visits quite often but they can be hard to spot. Easier in the coldest weather when they're short of food, but they do flit about very quickly and hide in the hedges and trees. Same with wrens - I saw one yesterday when it briefly hopped along the fence before disappearing into the neighbour's hedge.

    The nest is absolutely beautiful pansyface. Aren't birds so clever ? image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Bright starBright star Wrea GreenPosts: 695

    One of my favourite birds. Keep a look out for Firecrests too as they look very similar but have the white stripe either side of the "crest"

    image

    Life's tragedy is that we get old too soon and wise too late.

  • AngieRAngieR Posts: 345

    I always thought wrens were our smallest bird Muddle-Up.  I'm a city girl and other than sparrows could not ID one single bird 5 years ago.  According to the RSPB they are residents.

    pansyface - thanks for sharing the nest.  I'd be so fascinated and keep it too.

    Not many conifers on the doorstep here Fairygirl but there must be something unless they were just 'passing by', a bit like the kingfisher the other week.  I have 2 wrens visiting the garden regularly.  Lots of trellising covered with spiders webs = plenty of food for them.

    Bright star - thanks.  I'll keep a look out. 

  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 27,226

    I had two visit me this year but they didn't keep still enough for me to take a picture. First time I'd seen them in almost 35 years of living here. What a lovely picture you have there Angie.

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,089

    I've seen them here a few times over 25 years but not often. They're so tiny though, I could be missing them. When I have seen them it's the song that's drawn my attention.

    Great photoimage

  • AngieRAngieR Posts: 345

    Hopefully they will return to your garden Ladybird4 - luck was on my side with this shot I think.

    That's exactly what brought them to my attention nutcutlet.  I get so excited when I discover something new to the garden.  

  • I get them quite a lot here I suspect, near conifer woodland too, and we have larch trees, but mostly seen just as unidentified LBJs flitting around the wild areas. Best views are when they come hunting spiders round the windowframesimage

    The newcomers for me this year have been Redpolls, that have come to the bird feeders. They are tiny too and so pretty. According to my birdbook, right at the edge of their range here, so I feel very luckyimage

  • Bright starBright star Wrea GreenPosts: 695

    image 

    This is the image of the Firecrest that didn't seem to appear in my post. We get lots of birds overwintering in the uk from Siberia and northern Europe and especially during very cold spells. The UK is experiencing this at the moment with lots of birds arriving in Shetland and the east coast with some rarities amongst them and some are birds never recorded in the UK before. There's a good chance that some of the regular birds spotted in our gardens like robins, thrushes, Starlings etc are overwintering birds from Northern Europe. Oh I do miss my twitching days! 

    Life's tragedy is that we get old too soon and wise too late.

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,089

    great photo Bright star

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