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A Little Help With Strwberries?

Hi!

I am a complete an absolute beginner at gardening. My knowledge doesn’t exceed much further than the seed goes in the ground & I add water every now & then…

I have an idea as to what I want to grow… I’m just not sure how to do it correctly…

I’m looking at growing strawberries, I know the soil in my garden needs considerable work, work that I’m not yet ready to do so I’ll be growing them in a container.

My questions are: what do I need, how do I do it, when do I do it & how do I use the diggy things.

 

Thank you in advance!

Posts

  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 29,773

    The easiest thing to do is to buy some plants from a reputable seller and get them in quickly now. Any later may be too late.

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,913

    Don't use a 'strawberry' pot (the ones with holes all down the sides). They look nice but the plants dry out. Ordinary pots are best. Or hanging baskets.

    Bear in mind that when they are fruiting next summer they will need a steady water supply so put your pots near a tap/water butt/hose pipe.

    Use multi-purpose compost, buy plants now as LB said and get them in. They'll be fine outside but give them shelter from cold winds.

    Always aim the pointiest bit of of the diggy thing into the soil and away from your foot.

    Job's a good 'un image

    Come back in spring when you see a few flowers and someone will have some advice on the best way to feed them.

    “This isn't life in the fast lane, it's life in the oncoming traffic.”
    ― Terry Pratchett
  • Thank you for help!

    I was thinking I could plant strawberries in the spring of next year as I won’t be able to do them now. Would that be too late?

    The only way I’ll be able to water them would be with a watering can or jug, this makes it still doable? Also, I can use any old pot or is there a certain type that makes this easier for example plastic?

    I see where I am going wrong with the diggy thing, I shall remove it from my foot image

     

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,913
    Helen Clay says:

    I was thinking I could plant strawberries in the spring of next year as I won’t be able to do them now. Would that be too late?

    The only way I’ll be able to water them would be with a watering can or jug, this makes it still doable? Also, I can use any old pot or is there a certain type that makes this easier for example plastic?

    See original post

    Now is better but you'll probably find more mature plants in garden centres in about March time that you can pot on then. You'll get less fruit in the first season, most likely, than if you start now and you'll find they are more expensive as bigger plants than small bare roots you can get in autumn. It's not the end of the world though. You may have to settle for a few handfuls of strawbs rather than a glut for making jam. The plants live for 3 to 5 years though, so the second year should be much better.

    Yes you can water them with a watering can - I do - just put the pots somewhere you'll find it fairly easy to get to carrying a full watering can and where you'll see them often so you remember to do it (or is that just me? image )

    Any old pot. I use all sorts. You may find you get on better with one rather another in time - that's all part of the adventure image

    Last edited: 10 November 2016 12:28:30

    “This isn't life in the fast lane, it's life in the oncoming traffic.”
    ― Terry Pratchett
  • Thank you Ladybird4 & raisingirl

    I’ll do that!

    Don’t worry raisingirl, I’m forgetful at times to! I think I know how to go about this now.

    Do I use the fertiliser once or at certain intervals, if so, how frequently?

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 3,913

    Most of them say either once a fortnight or sometimes once a week. To get fruit (rather than leaves) you want a fertiliser that has a high potassium content. There are all sorts - depends if you want organic or whatever. They all come with instructions image

    Generally you don't need to start feeding them until they begin to flower, so plenty of time to get some research done (an excuse to hang about in the garden centre)

    “This isn't life in the fast lane, it's life in the oncoming traffic.”
    ― Terry Pratchett
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