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Bargain hellebores

Anna33Anna33 West SussexPosts: 285

Found some bargain hellebores today in Morrison's - £2 each. Small plants, just the common white one, but given my local garden centre is selling similar size ones for about £7 each (albeit buy one get one free), I was chuffed. And they're all in good condition, with fresh new growth showing at the base.

Anyway, if anyone's on the lookout for hellebores - try Morrison's.

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  • AuntyRachAuntyRach Posts: 4,473

    I bought some last month and they've bulked out already. Agree - good value.

    My garden and I live in South Wales. 
  • AuntyRachAuntyRach Posts: 4,473

    It's not Welsh aym - I am not fluent but those are not Welsh words - probably Gaelic?

    Boring films are good for a snooze though! 

    Last edited: 17 October 2016 22:06:16

    My garden and I live in South Wales. 
  • AuntyRachAuntyRach Posts: 4,473

    I think Gaelic is Celtic language which can be Irish, Scottish or Manx - but I'm not sure how these all differ. Welsh is different - even though we often think Welsh is 'celtic'.

    I don't really speak Welsh, even though I live in Wales, so I am not an authority! 

    Nos da, aym 

    (good night) image

    My garden and I live in South Wales. 
  • IamweedyIamweedy Cheshire East. Posts: 1,364

    I planted some late on last year and my sister sent me some off sets.  I am looking forward to seeing what actually comes up.

    Nos Da.




    'You must have some bread with it me duck!'

  • Anna33Anna33 West SussexPosts: 285

    AuntyRach -good to hear you've found them too, and they're still growing strong. Glad I picked up more than one, now...

    aym - you're welcome! I just wanted to share as I also get quite frustrated at the normally high prices charged for them.

    I always forget to check places like Morrison's/Aldi etc for these type of plants - in my head I never expect them to have anything more than sad looking bedding plants at best (Morrison's, mostly). Picked up a similarly small-seized pyracantha for a couple of quid from Aldi recently - they had a choice of "red" or "orange" pyracanthas (no other name or description, just red or orange. Love it.). That's growing on pretty strongly as well. Problem is, I don't have really room for one, but in my head I've got a vague idea that I can train it along a wall along one side of the garden, sort of espalier style. Luckily it's tiny enough at the moment to just sit in a pot until I decide where it goes. It's just hard to say no to such bargains...!

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,552

    Pyracantha isn't usually too rampant, just viciously prickly. makes a great wall climber as long as you don't have to get too close. Very attractive plant. I like Christmas roses. I have a few of the fancy hellebores too, but I have a huge beech tree in the garden that I want to underplant with something a bit less precious, so I might see if our local Morrisons has some of them left. Thanks for the tip image

    Just drifting briefly back to gaelic - gaelic is "q celtic" and varies quite a bit from Welsh, which is one of the "p celtic" languages. The celtic language spoken by the Irish and the Scots is essentially the same (the Scots also have another language which is not Gaelic just to confuse). The language spoken by the Welsh and the Bretons is also essentially the same (and Cornish and Manx were both also the same until they died out). So a native Cornish speaker and a Welsh speaker could understand one another with a certain amount of effort for dialect words and accents (like a Cockney Londoner speaking to a Geordie, for example.) Welsh and Irish speakers would find it much harder to converse, although the root of the language is the same, so more like an Englishman and a German. 

    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • When speaking, the people were (K)elts and their language is (K)eltic, but (S)eltic is the name of a football team, so be carefulimage

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,552

    I don't know why the football team Glasgow Celtic is always pronounced with a soft c and the name of the race of Europeans, the Celts with a hard c, but it may be the difference in the language. Certainly there are a significant number of pronunciation variations between the British (P celtic) and Pictish (Q celtic) languages; some sounds which don't exist in one and are common in the other.

    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,552

    Perhaps this will help (not)

    http://www.thepoke.co.uk/2011/12/23/english-pronunciation/

    image

    The only time I've laughed at a foreigner's English pronunciation (usually I feel nothing but sympathy) was an Australian cousin of OH who observed he'd got lost near LoogaBarooga (he meant Loughborough). But that was mostly because I liked their version better 

    Last edited: 18 October 2016 13:55:56

    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
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