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Need Detailed instruction on how to lift and divide Iris Sibirica

I asked on another thread for advice on my iris, was told they were 'Sibirica' and that they could do with dividing (they are flowering less each year and the leaves are falling all over the place).

I've looked all over the internet and it says the same thing, to 'lift and divide', I have NO idea how to do this, I'm reading stuff about 'rhizomes' and am feeling completely overwhelmed and confused. 

Right now the leaves (which are about 4ft high) are drooping and leaning on each other, there are 3 separate plants in the border and I hate to admit that I have been cutting the leaves to stop them falling all over the grass.

Can someone tell me exactly how I 'lift' and 'divide', I think I need to do it NOW (according to the sites I've looked at).  Or if you know of a link to a video which will show me I will be forever in your debt.

Renata

Last edited: 18 September 2016 03:36:52

Posts

  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 33,855

    Hi Renata. Dig up the complete clump of Irises. The older bits are usually in the middle of the clump. Break the clump apart and if it is rather tough use two garden forks back to back to force them. Take the younger pieces from the outside making sure they have roots and replant them where you want them at the same depth they were at in their old clump. Do not make the new bits too small.

    Lift - just means dig up.

    Divide - just means split up

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,245

    Good guide from Ladybird, Renata. I'd just add that the rhizome is the woody, knobbly bit the foliage grows from. Make sure there's a bit of that as well as root when you divide the plant.

    You might need something sharp to cut the pieces too - and old knife is ideal. image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Third rock from the sunPosts: 33,855

    I use a bread knife FG image

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • THANK YOU !!!

    Why can't the books be a concise and simple as you two have been - I'm sure they make things more complicated on purpose image

    What time of year is best to do any uplifting or moving from one place to another?  Is it always the same time of year for most plants or is it dependent on the type of plant?

    Renata

    x

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,245

    Do you use it after you've done the loaf Ladybird?  image  image

    After flowering is the usual time for Iris, as the plant is 'resting' and building up for the following year, although you may not get so many flowers. In some cases it'll rejuvenate them more though. 

    I move and divide plants at almost any time, other than winter,  but your own conditions sometimes dictate. We get a lot of rain even in summer, so that helps. Generally, you can move most things if the ground is suitable and they're not going to get dried out. If it's a big plant or shrub, they're best done in autumn when dormant, but you can lessen the stress by cutting the plant back, especially if it's an evergreen. 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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