Clay pot washing

Morning just thought I would see what cheap or near free tips others have for cleaning terracotta pots.

reason for asking is once again at my new garden I have given my self another job to do and that is create multi layered pots for the spring collection.

this has never been done here and I'm using 15 inch by 13 to hopefully create a spectacular collection to flower from now until the end of may

I am using late tulips then daffs then dwarf daffs then late crocus then early crocus then snow drops topped with violas

the pots are not really dirty so I am not going to clean the outside as I think they look more weathered how ever I wondered what home made products others have used with success in the past. thanks Lester

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Posts

  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 20,302

    Have to confess, I've never cleaned a plant pot in my life. image

    Devon.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,195

    If pots are muddy then I use a dry bristle scrubbing brush - other than that I leave clay pots well alone.  As you say, they look better 'weathered'. image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • bulkerbbulkerb Posts: 263

    Yes ok but I don't want any disease to be passed from the inside of the pots to my spring bulbs thought of power washing inside or using a mild bleach mix 

  • B3B3 Posts: 9,070

    I scrape the snails off the sides and step in them then I tip out anything inside.

    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,195

    Oh yes, B3, and make sure there aren't any slugs inside or sticking to the underneath!  image

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 23,668

    I wash mine with hot water and a little drop of detergent and then rinse them. I don't do anything to the outside other than wash any mud off them. They get well weathered here very quickly Dove image

    Although, like Hosta, I sometimes don't bother, depending on what's been in them and for how long. 

    I think that's an awful lot of layers of bulbs for one pot bulker. You won't get much soil/compost in there with that amount, and there's a chance they'll dry out and/or  lack nutrients and water over time. I'd go for a much bigger pot, or else plant up a couple of smaller ones with some of the crocus and smaller daffs and group them with your bigger pots.

    Just my opinion of course  image

    And somewhere on the hill
    Inside the past we hear the bells
    Catching only parts of thoughts
    And fragments of ourselves
    Till we begin
    Again


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,195

    I find three layers enough, even in big pots.  

    Usually do pink or pink & white tulips on the bottom, then grape hyacinths in the middle and white or cream early crocus on top and put a couple of small pieces of small-leaved variegated ivy at the edges of the pot to trail down the sides.

    Grape hyacinths are fab in layered pots - you can plant them really close and they burst upwards like a blue powder puff image  They also work well layered with Tete a tete or Minnow daffs.  

    Last edited: 11 September 2016 09:48:55

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 23,668

    I'd agree Dove - grape hyacinths ( and crocus)  cope with drier conditions too, which suits the tulips well. 

    I thought of getting some white grape hyacinths, but I've spent enough on bulbs recently...image

    And somewhere on the hill
    Inside the past we hear the bells
    Catching only parts of thoughts
    And fragments of ourselves
    Till we begin
    Again


  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 6,715

    I am with Hosta on this one. I have never washed a pot, or a tray, and have had no problems. About the only thing I clean are my secateurs.

    Time slide, place to hide, nudge reality
    Foresight, minds wide, magic imagery, oh-ho...
  • bulkerbbulkerb Posts: 263

    just wanted to thank other users for there replies and say to Fairy girl that yes I agree it does seem a little excessive therefore I might review my layering how ever if you watch differing videos on container planting you will find Sarah Raven planting a 3 tier max 4 tier pot.

    Cleeve nursery planting a 5 tier pot with pansies on top

    and an American video with 7 tiers so I think its a little bit of a should I shouldn't I moment I do understand every thing is fighting for nutrients but if I'm top of that they should last the distance lets see when I have the pot in front of me .

    Finally to add I'm going to lay up 2 big urns for winter 2 maybe 3 small Skimmia plants surrounded by cyclamen plants maybe drop some crocuses or snow drops just to finish again thanks Lester  

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