Mixing cremation ashes with soil

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Posts

  • My husband who was my soulmate and gardening partner, passed away recently and I was looking for ideas about what to do with his ashes when I came upon this lovely blog.

    For me its about not being able to let go. Right now I want to keep him as close as possible and, as I don't know if I'll ever be able to let him go, I like the idea of incorporating him into the soil beneath a lovely shrub or bush but in a pot that I can take with me if I decide to move house. I was thinking about a little magnolia stellate as they flower the earliest. I am however, concerned about having so much ash so I think putting them into a jar rather that mixing them into the soil is a great idea. Thank you 'Shrinking Violet' you're a star! The rest i'm going to put into a lovely Japanese box that I can bring outside whilst I'm gardening. He would appreciate the chance to supervise for a change!

    Last edited: 11 March 2017 18:26:50

  • Joanna56Joanna56 Posts: 1

    I will be moving this summer from my home after being here for 37 years. About 28 years ago I had my beloved Old English Sheepdog cremated. I received his ashes back in a small metal paint can. I buried the paint can under an old crab apple tree he loved laying under. Is there anyway I could dig up and retrieve this can or has it disintegrated after all these years? I am moving to Florida and would like to take his ashes with me. I cannot bear to leave him here.

  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 14,349

    Joanna56.   Have you made any enquiries whether it is permissible to take your dog's ashes to the U.S.A?

    SW Scotland
  • How should my ashes be added to my friend's garden?  What plant do well with ashes?

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICTPosts: 13,824

    YOUR ASHES?

    ARE YOU SPEAKING FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE?image

    HERE IS A LIST OF THE INGREDIENTS THAT GO INTO MAKING UP A HUMAN BEING.

    image

    ANY PLANT THAT LIKES THOSE WILL LIKE YOU.image

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • fidgetbonesfidgetbones Posts: 12,903

    We mixed my Dads ashes with soil and planted three fruit trees last year. The Apple now has five huge apples on it. It doesn't seem to be a problem, although I made sure there was a good mixing up.

    Last edited: 25 August 2017 21:20:07

    You don't stop doing new things because you get old, you get old because you stop doing new things. <3
  • IamweedyIamweedy Cheshire East. Posts: 1,263

    My sister and I put our parents ashes in a now very over grown small quarry. . The snow drops grew really well for several seasons. It must have been the bone meal.  At least it is unlikely to be built on. It is a lovely place to walk through to remember them. 

    My dads "pork pie"  Inspector Frost style hat spent many seasons there as a memory. We  always teased him about his hat. There is very  little left of it now as various creatures pulled out the lining to nest in.  Better than a tidy grave.




    'You must have some bread with it me duck!'

  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 1,698

    Please don't cremate me.  I'd rather feed the worms than heat the sky. And don't embalm me, I don't want to poison them.

  • IamweedyIamweedy Cheshire East. Posts: 1,263

    Then there is the land fill problem  and the noxious products of body decompostion soaking into the soil.  image  

    All of which happens up on Ilkley moor. In reality It might be a bit chilly for  ducks up on Ilkley moor. Particularly Baht 'at. 




    'You must have some bread with it me duck!'

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