Why do my Japanese Anemone's look like this?

Can anyone shed any light on why my Japanese Anemone's look like this? My neighbours have them in their garden border next to mine and they look lovely.

My Autumn border isn't working out as planned, the Aster frikartii monch's that I loved haven't all come back. I think some plants are invading others. 

imageimageimage

«1

Posts

  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 6,276

    It looks as if you have plenty of flower buds about to open on your plants.image

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICTPosts: 11,213

    SOME PLANTS ALWAYS INVADE OTHERS. AND IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR AN ARCH INVADER IT'S JAPANESE ANEMONE. GARDENING IS A CASE OF CONSTANT REFEREEING.

    ALSO, SOME PLANTS DON'T LIKE EACH OTHER. THEY WON'T LIVE TOGETHER AND THRIVE NO MATTER WHAT YOU DO. SOMETHING TO DO WITH CHEMICALS THEY EMIT AND FUNGI THAT THEY PROMOTE.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 20,247

    They look as if they've finished flowering to me. Mine always look a bit rough when they're done. I'd remove the spent heads so that they don't seed. 

    If they get very dry, they tend to look worse I think.

    to walk through a forest is to touch the past

  • Maybe they got too dry, I wasn't able to water the border when I went away. My neighbours look great but they've been gardening for 40 years and know what they are doing :-O I'll cut them back as they look untidy, they didn't flower much. 

    How can I find out which plants don't like each other? I didn't know that was the case. I planned my border based on plants that would look good together. Not sure about the Japanese Anemone's now. In a few months when it's cooler I might try and move a few things. Its a learning curve :-)

     

  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICTPosts: 11,213

    ALLELOPATHY IS THE PHENOMENON ALSO KNOWN AS PLANT WARFARE. IT IS MOSTLY SOMETHING THAT FARMERS ARE CONCERNED ABOUT AND NOT MUCH WORK HAS BEEN DONE BY GARDENERS.

    BUT MOST GARDENERS KNOW FOR EXAMPLE THAT YOU CAN'T PLANT A NEW ROSE IN THE SAME SOIL THAT AN OLD ROSE HAS GROWN IN. THE NEW ROSE WILL FAIL TO THRIVE BECAUSE THE OLD ROSE PRODUCED CHEMICALS WHICH MADE THE SOIL A HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT FOR ANY "INCOMER".

    THE OPPOSITE EFFECT IS SOMETIMES CALLED COMPANION PLANTING - WHEN PLANTS HELP EACH OTHER.

    HERE IS ONE ARTICLE ABOUT ALLELOPATHY.

    http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/allelopathic-plants.htm

    BUT IT IS USUALLY A CASE OF TRIAL AND ERROR.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 20,247

    Bluerose - can you do a pic of the whole plant and what's round it or nearby? That can help with advice. 

    For instance, are the anemones under a tree, or crowded by other planting? That will affect how they grow. I thought a could see some laurel or similar behind them which could be taking up a lot of water.  image

    Don't get too worried by it though. You'll get help with sorting the problem. It might just mean moving them to a better location, and that can be done soon - or even now. Any extra info will help. 

    to walk through a forest is to touch the past

  • PosyPosy Posts: 1,072

    Don't cut them back yet! They look old and tired and dry to me but not dead. Allow them to die back in their own time and then cut off and compost the top growth. Next year, feed your border, mulch in spring and keep an eye on watering in dry periods. In my experience, aster will grow perfectly well with JA's though you may have to stop invasion attempts. However, slugs love aster and may have eaten all the emerging shoots so have a look for their remains - the aster, not slugs! - before you draw any conclusions.

  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 6,276

    OOps......I need some new specs I thinkimage

    I have 2 J anemones - a basic pink job from my neighbour and a Honore Jobert.  

    Both are planted under trees and have had very little water.  Leaves are just about there but neither have flowered this year. A very dry season.  Still alive - flowered last year but nothing this year.

    Am planning on topping a huge Twisted willow in December - 30 foot I think with a canopy roughly the same so my underplanting should get a move on next year with any luck. 

  • YviestevieYviestevie Kingswinford, West MidlandsPosts: 4,242

    I think the problem could be that you haven't been deadheading them which means the plant thinks it's done its job and just needs to produce seed now.  Be warned about moving Jap Anem.  You will only spread them to another place.  I've been trying to get rid of the thugs for years but I'm still finding the odd one popping up. 

    Hi from Kingswinford in the West Midlands
«1
Sign In or Register to comment.