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Tying in a Fuchsia 'Lady Boothby'

LucidLucid Posts: 385

Hi everyone,

I've got a Fuchsia 'Lady Boothby' plant that needs to be tied in. Unfortunately when the shoots started to grow in the Spring they were a bit away from the trellis. I initially used some twine wrapped around the lower stems to help support it, and then added some further twine higher up. But it's not looking very good at all and now that they're getting taller I've just attempted to tie in the stems to the trellis. However to do that I have to slightly bend the stems backwards and I really don't know if this is right or not. There are some stems near the front that wouldn't reach right the way back to the trellis either.

The photos I've seen of them look so impressive but I have no idea how people manage to get them looking that good. Can anyone give me some pointers as to what I'm doing wrong, or how I can help it better?

Here's some photos:

image

image

image

As you can see in the final photo the front stems are quite a distance from the trellis.

Thanks for any help,

Lucid image

Posts

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,397

    I've seen pics of this one looking great but in reality I've seen this one looking a straggly mess. Fuchsias aren't climbing plants and this one is long and lanky which is not the same as climbing whatever the promotions sayimage

  • LucidLucid Posts: 385

    Thanks nutcutlet. I discovered last year that it was falsely sold as a climbing fuchsia. But I was told that if you tie it in it's fine and looks great. It just seems quite difficult to get it tied in without bending backwards. Was hopeful there might be some particular method to get it looking ok.

    Lucid image

  • nutcutletnutcutlet PeterboroughPosts: 26,397

    I should think you have to start when it's very young and bendy.

  • LucidLucid Posts: 385

    Thanks again nutcutlet. I'll have to try better next year then.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,506

    I also think that you have to be prepared to do some pruning, removing forward pointing shoots, rather as you would train a fruit tree against a wall. 

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • LucidLucid Posts: 385

    Thanks Dovefromabove, that makes sense. I've never trained a fruit tree but I'll do some research. Just out of interest would it be the same for a climbing rose as we've got one of those too. Am guessing it's probably a little late now to be pruning and training those shoots at the front?

    Lucid image

  • ButtercupdaysButtercupdays Posts: 4,007

    Not tried this myself, but think the best would be to treat it a bit like topiary and start with a strong cane  to support the main stem, like training a standard  and then as Dove says, to prune back shoots that over step the mark and to make it bush out more.  Probably could use a cone or cylinder of wire mesh or a wigwam of canes or an obelisk to keep the whole thing upright as well if required. Believe a certain promoter of these plants sells a hugely over--priced flower tower for the purposeimage

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