Forum home Problem solving

Problem roses

beccacharlton says:

Hi, I have a rose in my garden, no idea what it is, it was here when we moved in and it's one of the few plants we have kept. Am guessing it's quite old, it's growing and flowering well, but I have noticed something wrong with the leaves and can't figure out if it's black spot or rose rust. Can anyone give me some advice. Can I just treat for both, and is it possible to have both?

See original post

http://image1.gardenersworld.com/img.jpg?tag=d37f2215-2ad5-4aff-90b6-2acc2c87311d

http://image1.gardenersworld.com/img.jpg?tag=339a1e89-1f3d-4be7-bf52-85e3620a03db

http://image1.gardenersworld.com/img.jpg?tag=3a337afb-b4b2-45c9-bce1-a986f842fbdb

 

Posts

  • pansyfacepansyface Posts: 21,899

    HARD TO SAY REALLY AS THERE IS A LOT GOING ON THERE!

    SOME OF IT IS BLACKSPOT, SOME MIGHT BE RUST, SOME MIGHT BE THE RESULT OF APHIDS EXCRETING SUGAR WHICH IN ITS TURN FORMS A SOURCE OF FOOD FOR FUNGI.

    THE MAIN THING TO THINK ABOUT IS HOW CLINICALLY CLEAN YOU WANT YOUR GARDEN TO BE AND HOW HAPPY YOUR PLANTS ARE.

    I GROW ROSES AND I TRY TO LET THEM GET ON WITH THEIR LIVES WITHOUT INTERFERENCE. IF THEY FLOWER WELL AND GROW WELL THEN I AM HAPPY TO LET THEM LOOK LESS THAN IMMACULATE. A LOT LESS. 

    THE MORE YOU SPRAY THE MORE YOU ALTER THE NATURAL BALANCE OF THE GARDEN. IF YOUR ROSES ARE THRIVING BUT LOOKING RUBBISH IN MY OPINION THAT IS BETTER THAN THEM LOOKING LIKE PLASTIC AND THE ECO SYSTEM BEING ARTIFICIALLY MAINTAINED TO KEEP THEM LOOKING LIKE THAT.

    BUT I AM NOT A FAN OF FIDDLING ABOUT WITH THINGS I BARELY UNDERSTAND.

    Last edited: 13 July 2016 11:11:40

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
    If you live in Derbyshire, as I do.
  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Posts: 36,183

    Totally agree with pf

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • Missy KrissyMissy Krissy Posts: 249

    That's a really great way of looking at it pf! I'm also struggling with a couple of my roses - but after reading your post I'm totally changing my tactic!! Thanks image

  • They seem happy enough, they were really heavily pruned last year when we moved in (the garden had been left overgrown for years) and it's growing and flowering well, maybe too well as its so tall now I am struggling to reach to dead head! And am not bothered about unsightly leaves, more concerned it's damaging the plant and if it needs sorting.

    Is it best just to remove the damaged leaves? 

    Last edited: 13 July 2016 13:14:39

  • Ladybird4Ladybird4 Posts: 36,183

    If the leaves are really, really damaged, then yes, you can remove them.

    Cacoethes: An irresistible urge to do something inadvisable
  • Dave MorganDave Morgan Posts: 3,123

    Becca the best remedy for any infection is really good feeding. Mulching with well rotted manure, rose feeds, seaweed feeds or comfrey feeds. Strong roses are more able to resist infection. By the way I think that's both rust and blackspot.

  • Nanny BeachNanny Beach Posts: 8,427

    Went to visit lovelly garden recently, they told me remove the leaves, feed with tomato feed, they do get fed autumn and spring with manure.

Sign In or Register to comment.