Breaded Iris Question?

Kirstin84Kirstin84 Posts: 12

Hi all, we moved into our house two years ago, it's been a project house to say the leasT. I've kept on top of the garden but this year I've started doing more. There were some bearded iris in the garden already and I'm wondering if I need to cover the roots? They are all on show between the plants. Is this normal or should I use compost the cover them? ive read up on dividing them which I'm going to do just wondering if they need more than just this? Thanks

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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,316

    Hi Kirstin, the bearded Irises need their rhizomes (the bit you're seeing) exposed to the sun as much as possible to keep them right, so don't cover them at all image

    Dividing helps to renew their vigour as they spread outwards in a circle. When they're divided, you keep the healthy bits on the outside of the ring and discard all the middle sections which won't flower so well.

    I have to say I laughed when I read your heading as I quite fancy 'breaded'; irises! image image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Kirstin84Kirstin84 Posts: 12

    Oh haha I think my phone must of changed that! New variety ;-)

    Oh thanks. I couldn't seem to find anything to explain this to me! New gardener here so I'm learning, find this website and all you more experienced gardeners a god send! I never appreciated how much there is to learn it must be never ending. I'm certainly enjoying it though.

    Thank you for your help. I'm nervous to split them in case i ruin them! I am right that i can actually split them with a spade can't I? They have spread a fair bit so I'd like to move some to another bed. How bigger sections should I plant them in? Does it matter or just whatever I need for the area allowing space for the to spread further?? Sorry lots of questions. I was going to split them last year and chickened out!! I can picture them all dying! Thanks again.

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,316

    As long as you have piece with a few healthy shoots on it, with a few inches of rhizome and some roots, that's sufficient to plant up. Just discard the ropey , dead bit from the centre of the main plant. You can always pot sections up for planting later too. If in doubt, keep the section quite big and replant straight away to give them time to get established.  Spade or knife - whatever's easiest. Give them enough room to mature - they get quite big as you've already seen  image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Kirstin84Kirstin84 Posts: 12

    Thank you very much. I'm going to give it a go this afternoon image

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,316

    Hope it went ok Kirstin.  Sometimes it's easier to get them  back in the ground asap because they can be a bit wobbly due to the fact they're planted so shallow. Just keep an eye on them initially till they get their roots down securely  image

    I had to dash back to work right after my last post, so couldn't reply to you immediately!   image

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Mm breaded, served with a garlic dip? Delicious image

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,316

    gffinch  image 

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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